Tag Archives: Pepe le Pew

Identity Issues: Pepe le Pew in Archive Art Exhibit

"Scent-imental Over You" is the second Pepe le Pew cartoon directed by Chuck Jones.  This 'Scent' was released in theaters nationwide on May 8, 1947, a couple of years after Pepe's first film, "Odor-able Kitty" and two years before Jones won his first Oscar (who, BTW, is going on holiday, watch this space for more news in the coming days as to his whereabouts…) for the Pepe le Pew vehicle "For Scent-imental Reasons".  

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This original production layout drawing by Chuck Jones of Pepe chasing after the poor little Chihuahua (who as a "Mexican Hairless" has disguised himself in his mistress's furs so that he would look more like the other dogs, alas to his chagrin) is graphite on 12 field two-hole punch animation paper.  It will be featured in the Archive Art Exhibit at Art Partners Gallery this Saturday, February 5th at 7:30 PM. Throw on your snowshoes and come meet Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones' grandson, as he inaugurates the exhibit Chuck Jones: Frame by Frame, An Animator's Story at the gallery.  More details?  Call 847-517-5757!  

The cartoon has Russian translations for the dialogue, but you'll get the idea…

Image of the Day: Cats Bah

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"Darling! I have waited por vu."  Pepé le Pew makes his move in this original layout drawing by Chuck Jones for his 1954 short film, "Cats Bah."  In this film, the most Boyer-referential outing of the amorous skunk, Pepé is found reminiscing about his greatest love when he his smitten by the "belle Americaine touriste femme skunk."  The drawing is graphite on 12 field, two-hole punch animation paper and measures 10.5" x 12.5".  

Image of the Day: Two Scent’s Worth

With all this talk about Pepé le Pew coming to the big screen and being voiced by Mike Myers, what could we do but post a couple of great layout drawings of the notorious le skunk français as created by his father, Chuck Jones.  If you'd like to read some of the blog posts and such, please click here or here or here or here.  You get the idea, it's le news du jour!

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Original layout drawing of Pepé le Pew by Chuck Jones for his 1955 "Two Scent's Worth", graphite on 12 field animation paper.

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"Le Mew, le meow" purrs the exquisite pussycat in Chuck Jones' "Two Scent's Worth" of 1955.  Original layout drawing, graphite on 12 field animation paper, 10.5" x 12.5".  

Image of the Day: Who Scent You

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“Who Scent You” premiered in theaters nationwide
on April 23, 1960.  In this Pepé le Pew vehicle, Chuck Jones
along with writer Michael Maltese continued their examination of all things le
Francais.  With classics like “Your
aloneness is almost ovair” and “You are my peanut, I am your brittle,” who
could argue with the e’scent’ial reasoning of this amorous skunk?  This original layout drawing by Chuck Jones includes his dialog notes (graphite on 12 field animation paper, 10.5″ x 12.5″).  

 

Image of the Day: Louvre Come Back to Me

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"Louvre Come Back to Me" was the last of 17 cartoons that starred Chuck Jones' inimitable skunk of a lover, Pepé le Pew, bowing in theaters on August 18, 1962 (shortly before Warner Bros. Animation was shuttered.)  This is a background layout, from co-director, Maurice Noble, drawn with graphite and colored pencil on 12 field (10.5" x 12.5") animation paper.  It will be featured in the exhibit, "Chuck Jones: An Animator's Life From A to Z-Z-Z-Z" which opens May 14th at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills (closing August 22, 2010.) 

One of Pepé's greatest lines (at least in my opinion) comes from this cartoon:  "Where are you, my little objet d'art?  I am going to collect you!" 

Image of the Day: Soundstage

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"Soundstage" a 16 field (13.5" x 33") pan cel art edition of 750

Chuck Jones on Pepé le Pew:  "If you can't do it yourself, animate somebody who can–Pepé le Pew, for example.   Pepé's sexual confidence is absolute.  he sees rejection as no more than a temporary setback, and every pursuit as an interesting variation on the road to inevitable success.  (For myself, as an eighteen-year-old I took every expression from every girl as a rejection.  If I couldn't find a rejection I liked, I would invent one.)

"Pepé is the individual I always wanted to be, so sure of his appeal to women that it never occurs to him that his attentions might be unwelcome, or even offensive.  I tried to make Pepé's confidence a part of my own personality, hoping to share in his sexual success.  On the screen it worked." 

New Mexico’s Rose Parade Float Starring Pepe le Pew Wins Grand Marshall’s Trophy!

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(AP Photo/Jason Redmond)

New Mexico’s 2010 Rose Parade float “Enchantment is in the Air” won the coveted Grand Marshall’s Trophy for the second time in their fifth outing in Pasadena’s renowned Rose Parade.  Designed by Raul Rodriguez, the float featured the Warner Bros. animation characters, Pepe Le Pew and Penelope Pussycat, created by director and creator Chuck Jones. 

 

In the video below, Raul Rodriguez of Fiesta Floats discusses his inspirations for last year’s New Mexico float (starring Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner) as well as those for this year’s entry.

If You Were an Amorous Skunk–Where Would You Spend New Year’s Day?

Chuck Jones' delightful character, Pepé le Pew, will make his Rose Parade début Friday morning, New Year's Day as the floats roll down Colorado Avenue in Pasadena, California.   Chuck writes, "He [Pepé] sees rejection as no more than a temporary setback, and every pursuit as an interesting variation  on the road to inevitable success."

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So, whether you're attending the parade or comfortably settled in at home, keep an eye out for our favorite skunk Friday morning!