Category Archives: The Art of Chuck Jones

…Ta Da! Friday’s and Saturday’s Winners Are…

Our Friday (#5) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Bruce Gamble of Alabama!  Bruce will receive a hand-painted cel art “Director’s Cut” edition, titled, “Fast and Furry-ous”! Congratulations, Bruce!

Fast and Furry-ous, a Director's Cut edition

Fast and Furry-ous, a Director’s Cut edition

And, that’s not all! Our Saturday (#6) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Ron Eenhuis of Colorado!  Ron will receive a hand-painted cel art edition, titled, “Georgia on My Mind”! Congratulations, Ron!

Georgia on My Mind, a hand-painted cel art edition by Eric Goldberg

Georgia on My Mind, a hand-painted cel art edition by Eric Goldberg

Our Sunday and final winner will be announced tomorrow. Thank you everyone who participated!

…And Our Thanksgiving Day Winner Is…

Our Thanksgiving day (#4) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Scott Johnston of North Carolina! Scott will receive a limited edition fine art reproduction on canvas, titled, “Still a Stinker”! Congratulations, Scott!

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…And We Have Our First Winner! Black Friday Week Give-aways!

Our Monday winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Stan Stinson of Alabama! Stan will receive a limited edition fine art lithographic reproduction of the lobby card created for the 1957 Chuck Jones-directed, “Zoom and Bored”! Congratulations, Stan!

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A Great Yellow Dog and a Letter from Uncle Lynn

These two items, a drawing by Chuck Jones of “The Great Yellow Dog” and a letter from Uncle Lynn to Chuck and his siblings on the death of their beloved dog, Teddy, are not mutually exclusive, but they do underscore the importance of character animation that Jones was such a master of and his deep well of resourcefulness.

"The Great Yellow Dog", graphite and crayon on 12 field MGM animation paper, 10.5" x 12.5", circa mid-1960s, by Chuck Jones.

“The Great Yellow Dog”, graphite and crayon on 12 field MGM animation paper, 10.5″ x 12.5″, circa mid-1960s, by Chuck Jones.

Dear Peggy and Dorothy and Chuck and Dick,

I had a telephone call last night. “Is this Uncle Lynn?” someone asked.

“Why yes,” I said. “My name is Lynn Martin. Are you some unregistered nephew?”

“This is Teddy.” He sounded a little impatient with me. “Teddy Jones, Teddy Jones the resident dog of 115 Wadsworth Avenue, Ocean Park, California. I’m calling long distance.”

“Excuse me,” I said. “I really don’t mean to offend you, but I’ve never heard you talk before—just bark, or whine, or yell at the moon.”

“Look who’s talking,” Teddy sniffed, a really impatient sniff if ever I’ve heard one. “Look, Peggy and Dorothy and Chuck and Dick seem to be having a very rough time of it because they think I’m dead.” Hesitate. “Well, I suppose in a way I am.”

I will admit that hearing a dog admit that he was dead was a new experience for me, and not a totally expected one. “If you’re dead,” I asked, not being sure of just how you talk to a dead dog, “how come you’re calling me?” There was another irritated pause. Clearly he was getting very impatient with me.

“Because,” he said, in as carefully a controlled voice as I’ve ever heard from a dog. “Because when you are alive, even if the kids don’t knowexactly where you are, they know you’re someplace. So I just want them to know I may be sort of dead, but I’m still someplace.”

“Maybe I should tell them you’re in Dog Heaven, Teddy, Maybe to make ‘em feel—”

“Oh, don’t be silly.” Teddy cleared his throat. “Look, where are you?”

“Oh, no, you don’t. We’re trying to find out where you are,” I barked.

“Hey, I didn’t know you could bark.” He sounded impressed with my command of the language.

“Wait just a minute,” I said. “You had to know where I am, or you couldn’t have called me on the telephone, right?”

“Boy, you know so little,” said Teddy. “I simply said I called you long distance. Who said anything about a telephone? They asked me if I knew where you were, and I said you were someplace else, besides 115 Wadsworth Avenue. So they dialled someplace else and here I am and here you are.”

“Can I call you back?” I asked dazedly. “Maybe that’ll give me a clue.”

“Be reasonable,” said Teddy. “How can you call me back when neither you nor I know where I am?”

“Oh, come on, give me a clue,” I begged desperately. “For instance, are there other dogs around there? I’ve got to tell the kids something.”

“Hold it,” said Teddy, apparently looking around. “I did see a pug/schnauzer with wings a minute ago. The wings could lift the schnauzer part of him off the ground, but the pug part just sort of dragged through the grass bumping into fireplugs.”

“Fireplugs?”

“Orchards of them, hundreds of ‘em. Yellow, red, white, striped. Unfortunately, I don’t seem to have to pee anymore. I strain a lot, but all I get is air. Perfumed air,” he added proudly.

“Sounds like Dog Heaven to me,” I said. “Are there trees full of lamb chops and stuff like that?”

“You know,” Teddy sighed. “For a fair to upper-middle-class uncle, you do have some weird ideas. But the reason I called you was Peggy, Dorothy, Chuck, and Dick trust you and will believe anything you say, which in my opinion is carrying the word ‘gullible’ about as far as it will stretch. Anyway, gullible or not, they trust you, so I want you to tell them that I’m still their faithful, noble, old dog, and—except for the noble part—that I’m in a place where they can’t see me but I can see them, and I’ll always be around keeping an eye, an ear, and a nose on them. Tell them that just because they can’t see me doesn’t mean I’m not there. Point out to them that during the day you can’t see the latitudes and you can’t really see a star, but they’re both still there. So get a little poetic and ask them to think of me as ‘good-dog,’ the good old Teddy, the Dog Star from the horse latitudes, and not to worry, I’ll bark the britches off anybody or anything that bothers them. Just because I bit the dust doesn’t mean I can’t bite the devils.”

That’s what he said. I never did find out exactly where he was, but I did find out where he wasn’t—not ever very far from Peggy, Dorothy, Chuck and old Dick Jones.

Sincerely,

Lynn Martin, Uncle at Large

I Dare You All, Test Your Strength: Open a Book

Chuck Jones found inspiration in many places, but of all of the sources, reading was perhaps the most fertile place for him. Here’s a letter he wrote exhorting its reader(s) to “test your strength: open a book.”

letters of note CJ

 

Transcript:

Knowing how to read and not reading books is like owning skis and not skiing, owning a board and never riding a wave, or, well, having your favorite sandwich in your hand and not eating it. If you owned a telescope that would open up the entire universe for you would you try to find reason for not looking through it? Because that is exactly what reading is all about; it opens up the universe of humour, of adventure, of romance, of climbing the highest mountain, of diving in the deepest sea.

I found my first experience with Wile E. Coyote in a whole hilarious chapter about coyotes in a book called Roughing It by Mark Twain. I found the entire romantic personality of Pepe Le Pew in a book written by Kenneth Roberts, Captain Hook. I found bits and pieces of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and all the others in wonderful, exciting books.

I dare you all, test your strength: Open a book.

Sincerely,

[Source: Letters of Note]

Chuck Jones: Drawn from the Far Side Exhibition to Open at Bowers Museum in April

The Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California announced today that the exhibit, Chuck Jones: Drawn from the Far Side, will open on Saturday, April 26 and close August 3, 2014.

Celebrated as one of the greatest directors from the “golden age” of animation, Chuck Jones worked in the field some seventy years until his death at eighty‐nine in 2002. His passion for drawing was both work and full time hobby. He drew for a living, and he drew for pleasure and challenge.

This exhibit contains original drawings, most never publicly displayed, including a section of 50 so‐called “Doodles,” perhaps best described as coming from one artist’s very far side. The majority of drawings are from the private collection of Jones’ widow, Marian. In collaboration with the non-profit Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. For more information, please visit Bowers.org.

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Live Bidding at the Red Dot Auction!

The Center is truly thankful to all of the artists and wonderful people who have worked their creative magic to bring this year's Red Dot Auction together! 

To top off this Saturday evening, the Center will present three unique live auction items:

  1. Imagine if you will the sound of splashing fountains,
    the tinkle of champagne glasses
    , good friends laughing, standing in the company
    of a talented visual artist and having conversations about art and creativity.
    It can be yours when you are the successful bidder on this live auction
    item.  Spend an evening with the painter
    Mike Kungl and his wife, Dana, at their home and studio in the hills of Orange County.
    This event, possibly a life-changing one (you may walk away thinking of
    becoming an artist), is good for you and up to nine of your friends and is
    supplemented by a $1000 gift certificate from 24 Carrots catering donated by Jon Brown and Norm Bennett, the owners of 24 Carrots. 
  2. A Super Colossal Bugs Bunny Drawing Lesson! Learn to draw
    Bugs Bunny in the THE CHUCK JONES style. Art director of “The Little Mermaid”
    and many other important Disney Studio films, Mike Peraza will sit down with
    you one-to-one and teach you to draw Bugs Bunny from his chubby wittle feet to
    his big pointed ears. At this personalized drawing lesson Mike will share with
    you drawing techniques he has developed in his over 40 years of Disney and
    Warner Bros. feature animation, along with his work in television, book,
    comics, and theme park design—can you say “Cars Land”? Mike will not only teach
    and guide you on your drawing of Bugs Bunny but will also do an original Bugs
    Bunny drawing just for you. Your lesson, scheduled at a mutually convenient
    time, can take place here at the Center or at Mike’s studio in Burbank. This special
    package also includes several DVDs of Disney feature films that Mike has worked
    on. And to tie the entire experience right back to the Father of Bugs Bunny,
    you will also receive an original sketch of Bugs Bunny by none other than Chuck
    Jones himself!
  3. A tisket, a tasket, a bright yellow basket stuffed with
    all sorts of goodies
    –tickets for four to the July 6 performance at the
    Hollywood Bowl of “Bugs Bunny at the Symphony”, a picnic dinner, along with two
    bottles of wine, special Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote goblets, a Jones family-owned Levi jacket from the Warner Bros.
    Studio Stores
    . Plus you’ll go backstage after the performance with Linda Jones Clough to meet the conductor and creator of
    “Bugs Bunny at the Symphony” George Daugherty. You’ll be skipping all the way
    to Hollywood! Also, you'll receive "Bugs Conductor" hand-embellished by Linda Jones. This fine art reproduction on canvas resides in some of the great symphony halls around the globe that have been the venue for performances of "Bugs Bunny at the Symphony." 

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Do You Red Dot?

You'll have to forgive Chuck Redux, but we are obsessed with the art that's been donated for this year's Red Dot Auction. From the four corners of the continent–North American, that is–to the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity the works of art have been flowing in this past couple of weeks. We are close to receiving 100 works — which was our goal — to celebrate the centennial year of Chuck Jones. 

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There are paintings of horses…

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…and then there are paintings of horses <nudge, nudge, wink, wink>. 

There are abstract works of art — including photography — that are as brilliantly conceived as the most complex oil painting.

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Yes, it's a photograph.

And there are charming re-imaginings and what-ifs:

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In other words, there is something for everyone at the Red Dot Auction! Bidding begins at only $100.00–and all of the proceeds help fund the creativity programs of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity like Pastelicious and Dynamic Dioramas led by the Center's resident teaching artist, Christopher Scardino, who by-the-way, has contributed a stunning work of art to the Red Dot.

So, do you Red Dot? Would you like more information about bidding long-distance? Contact any of our galleries, or Chuck Redux and we'll gladly help you find the work that means the most to you. Which artist's work will you take home?

Chuck Redux: robert@ChuckJonesCenter.org

Chuck Jones Gallery, Costa Mesa: CostaMesa@ChuckJones.com or 866-Chuck Jones

Chuck Jones Gallery, Santa Fe: SantaFe@ChuckJones.com or 800-290-5999

Chuck Jones Gallery, San Diego: SanDiego@ChuckJones.com or 888-294-9880

Oscar Goes Hawaiian!

Craig Kausen, grandson of Chuck Jones and president of the Chuck Jones Companies, traveled this week to the beautiful island of Maui as the special guest of Dolphin Galleries who are currently hosting an exhibition and sale of the art of four-time Academy Award recipient, Chuck Jones.

Steve Cat Craig and Nick
Craig Kausen, second from left, with Nick Schlag (far left), Sylvester the cat and Dolphin Gallery founder, Stephen Schlag.

Oscar in Case
Chuck's Oscar for "The Dot and the Line", best short animated film of 1965 is given a place of honor in a display of photographs, drawings, and letters on loan from the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.

Janna and Christine with Oscar
Oscar, as his wont, also got special attention from Dolphin Gallery art consultants, Janna and Christine.

Craig showing art
During the reception on Thursday evening, Craig took time with each of the collectors to discuss the subtleties and nuances of the art of the animated film.

Little Boy Watching Cartoons
Of course, some future collectors of Chuck Jones art were more interested in what was happening on the screen than off!

Children with Cat
Sylvester the cat was a big hit with visitors to the Dolphin Galleries in the Shops at Wailea. Did you know that in Chuck Jones cartoons, Sylvester never spoke?

Film Strip Display
Dolphin Galleries's very own Christian Adams designed a unique way to display the original production art that was featured in the exhibition and sale.

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A portion of the Chuck Jones exhibition and sale at Dolphin Galleries, the Shops at Wailea, Maui.

Craig and Client
Craig shared stories of growing up with Chuck Jones with collectors this past Thursday evening.

Craig with Children
Kids love Chuck Jones! (So do their parents!)

Teresa with Popcarn cart
Shhh, don't tell anyone, but Dolphin Galleries art consultant, Teresa, sneaked a bag of popcorn. 

Asa Flowers Arrangement
The flowers of Maui are nearly as spectacular as the Chuck Jones art on display.

Sam with oscar
Oscar sends "Aloha" from Maui! (Oscar's companion courtesy Kimberley and Craig Kausen.)

 

Are You Going to the Grand Opening at the Cartoon Art Museum?

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Original layout drawing by Chuck Jones for "The Bugs Bunny TV Show" circa 1961.

Tomorrow night, March 23rd from 6 to 9 PM PDT, the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and the Cartoon Art Museum present the grand opening of the exhibition, "Chuck Jones: Drawing on Imagination, 100 Years of an Animated Artist. 100 works of art from his early career through his last projects are presented in this retrospective of the genius of Chuck Jones. You'll meet some very hip people: Linda Jones Clough, daughter of Chuck Jones; Marian Jones, his widow; and Craig Kausen, his grandson. You'll also have the opportunity to visit with some old friends such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Marvin Martian, Wile E. Coyote, and the Road Runner. Tickets, from $10.00 to $50.00, are available by clicking here or at the door. The Cartoon Art Museum is located at 655 Mission St. in the SoMA Arts District of San Francisco. Call 1-415-CAR-TOON for more details. Be there or be square!