Tag Archives: Wile E. Coyote

When in Doubt, Ask…You Never Know Who Might Answer

Chuck Redux recently came across a flurry of questions about the value of visiting the Chuck Jones Experience at Circus Circus in Las Vegas on a Vegas Message Board

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They were good questions, and it seemed like an opportunity for someone close to Chuck Jones to answer them. 

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So, Craig Kausen, Chuck's grandson had this to say in reply to their questions:

"Well, I must start out by revealing that I'm terribly biased in my review of the Chuck Jones Experience. I am Chuck Jones' grandson, Craig.

"However, although I must say that I personally think it is well worth the admission price, each person or group that sends me notes, text messages, pictures, or even actual letters (forbid!), has said that they were enthralled by the journey they were taken on inside the Experience. Just yesterday a friend said her accountant was out there with 10 young soccer players (10 or 12 years old), along with parents, and although she thought it was big ticket amount for the group when they arrived, she said they spent a couple of hours and could hardly get the kids and many of the parents to leave when they had to go to their next game.

"It is like walking inside of a Chuck Jones cartoon that is super life-sized, as well as walking into his studio (with his actual desk setting right before you), that includes hundreds of books from his own personal library, so you can glimpse a bit inside of his genius. 

"There is a room where you can see how you measure up next to Life-sized characters and then walk into a filming of a Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoon being filmed by Bugs Bunny and directed by Daffy W. Griffith, all in larger than life-sized three dimensional creations.

"There are over 250 original works of art ranging from historical production materials to oil paintings, to traditional fine art, all by Chuck himself.

"There is also an interactive area where you can record sound effects at the Rikki Tikki Tavi Foley station and create your own Zoetrope animation strip.

"There are great photo opportunities throughout.

"If I'm there, I'll take you on a personal tour too!

"And, yes, there are plenty of t-shirts to be had as well as other great things to take home if you like.

"I'll even make a bold statement that if you don't like it, ask for Neil and I'm sure he'll give you your money back. (Neil???)

"Plus, there are $5 coupons all over Las Vegas to make it even more affordable.

"I hope you at least go by to take a look if you're in town.

Craig

"PS Gregrio, you are so right about THE Steak House at Circus Circus. Best steaks I've ever had…"

To read the entire thread, click on Chuck's photo below.

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And when in Vegas, do as the Vegans do. Or is that do as the Vegasians do? Or is it Vegasites? Hmmm, something to think about…

ACME Quicksand, the Tool Drawer, and a Spiny Frog

Chuck Jones Homage artist, Bob Elias, dropped by the other day to show us his progress on a new painting he's been working on of Road Runner with Wile E. Coyote mired in a puddle of ACME Quicksand.

"The Coyote is a history of my own frustration and war with all tools, multiplied only slightly. I can remember my wife and daughter would start to weep bitterly and seek hiding places whenever they saw me head toward the tool drawer, if only to hang a picture. I have never reached into that devilish drawer without starting a chain of errors and disasters of various but inevitable proportions. Like any other man, I would rather succeed in what I can't do than do what I have successfully done before. I have never reached into that drawer without encountering one of those spiny things you stick flowers in. We don't keep that thing in that drawer, but it is always there. I count it a good day when I get only one spine under a fingernail. I tried to get the spiny thing out of the drawer once, but found out that the last time, when it had stuck to four fingers at once and had been lifted a few inches out of its next in the resulting shriek, it had fallen on a tube of glue, puncturing the tube and affixing itslef to the drawer for all time. I have tried lackadaisicallly from time to time to remove it, and have succeeded in breaking a rattail file, a kitchen knife, three fingernails, a nailfile, a pair of manicure scissors, an eggbeater (in one of my more fanciful efforts), and a window, when the tail of the rattail file separated from the rattail file." –Chuck Jones, writing in his 1989 autobiography, "Chuck Amuck, the Life and Times of a Animated Cartoonist"

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Chuck Jones Homage artist Bob Elias on the left with this blog's author posing with a painting of quicksand that also includes Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. And yes, you're not mistaken, those are Christmas decorations hanging up above our heads. We would have taken them down sooner, but decided that we liked their resemblance to planets and outer space, so left them until just the other day, when they finally were removed and stored for another time. Time is relative, is it not?

P.S. What did this post have to do with spiny frogs? Leave a comment if you think you know why. Who knows the first person to answer correctly may win something! 

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity Welcomes Guest Film Curator

This just could not wait another minute…

The Guest Curator page on the soon-to-be-brand-new-exciting-and-thrilling Chuck Jones Center for Creativity website will be devoted to commentary provided by a variety of experts and fans of the art and films of Chuck Jones.  Throughout this series, we plan to bring you new insight and fresh perspectives on Jones's oeuvre.  Stay tuned!

Animation expert, author, and historian, Jerry Beck, graciously agreed to inaugurate the Guest Curator page on the Center's website, but due to a delay in launching that brand-new-exciting-and-thrilling-website, we've decided to share his insights with you today here at Chuck Redux.  Selecting three Chuck Jones cartoons to highlight proved a challenge, but one he met with his usual gusto, delight, and expertise.   Read on! 

ONE FROGGY EVENING – Chuck Jones probably never set out to create a classic when he began directing this one-shot cartoon (originally titled “It Hopped One Night”), but that’s exactly what he did. Michael Maltese’s premise, about a singing frog that performs only in view of its owner, must have appealed to Chuck for its witty use of popular tunes from an earlier generation, and a story told virtually through pantomime, poses and facial expressions.
 
But it turned out to be (in my humble opinion) his greatest piece of animation storytelling, where every subtle nuance conveys feelings we can all relate to, including happiness, greed, frustration and failure. One Froggy Evening plays upon our desire to achieve the American Dream of easy success, and finds humor in the realities of how that success may or may not be obtained. Jones’ animation unit at this time was at the height of its talents, producing cartoons as contemporary as the UPA shorts, as timeless as Disney, and utterly original on their own terms. A masterpiece!
Unfortunately, One Froggy Evening is only available by hyperlink, click on the title in this sentence to watch the cartoon.
 
OPERATION RABBIT – The best cartoon characters represent identifiable personalities that are either who we are – or who we want to be. Operation Rabbit presents the eternal battle between those two forces. Bugs Bunny has always been smarter than his various adversaries (think Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam and Taz), but here he encounters his brainest foe – a “genius” in fact – Wile E. Coyote.
 
Jones concocted the coyote as the personification of his own bewilderment with tools, machinery or simply building things. He knew how funny this sort of character could be up against the cool, calm and confident Bugs, just as he was in his debut film versus the Road Runner two years earlier.
 
Operation Rabbit is Wile E.’s second screen appearance and his first speaking role (not to mention the first time the character is named). I personally think its one of the best Bugs Bunny cartoons ever made and debatably the funniest. The scene of the coyote hanging on a rock ledge, having just been blown to bits by a train hitting his nitro glycerin shack, repeating his name “Wile E. Coyote, Super-Genius” – that never fails to make me laugh out loud. I know that guy. He’s me, he’s Chuck and he’s probably you.
 
Unlike the Coyote, Jones hit the Bullseye with this one!
 

SCAREDY CAT – Scaredy Cat is the first of several Porky Pig and Sylvester “Gothics”, three cartoons Jones made with a similarly eerie premise, and one of my all-time favorites. This one has the pair spending a hair raising night in an old dark house. The humor comes from Sylvester’s observations and actions to protect an oblivious Porky from a legion of killer mice.
 
Every director at Warners had their shot to work with Porky and Sylvester and each succeeded in creating an individual persona for the characters. Jones’ Porky is never more appealing than he is here – optimistic, self-assured and quite a strict pet owner. Sylvester is also tweaked in a Jonesian way: silent and scared, paranoid yet uncharacteristically brave. Oh, and I also believe this is the first cartoon where the cat (unnamed in previous screen appearances under Clampett, Davis and McKimson – and dubbed “Thomas” in Freleng’s Oscar winning “Tweetie Pie”) is given his proper name, Sylvester.
 
That sound like something Jones and Maltese would make up for this speech-impaired putty tat. “Sufferin’ Succotash!”

 

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity: Gala Grand Opening at South Coast Collection!

Where to start?  It's taken a day just to decompress after all of the hoopla and foopla and other oopla's, but we're here to tell you that Saturday night at 3321 Hyland Avenue, Costa Mesa was a rock 'em, sock 'em, knock-out of an evening!  The doors opened at 6 PM and within a few minutes the 8000 square foot space was filled to the brim with southern California's brightest and best.  Artists, animators, writers, and actors, event planners, wedding strategists, publicists, and collectors all converged (harmonically even) to celebrate the partnership of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity with 24 carrots Catering & Events.  

Raffle winners (with many thanks to Lauren (11) and David (9) who tirelessly worked the room selling raffle tickets) chose from a wall of art; hundreds crowded around the Silent Auction wall and placed their bids; it seemed at times that there were a thousand people there, but more likely something like 400 friends and supporters of creativity, along with lovers of the art of Chuck Jones (which was everyone) came together to support the educational programs of the Center.  We thank and salute you for your gracious and generous donations.  Please take a bow!

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Chairman of the Center and Chuck's grandson, Craig Kausen, with his wife, Flavorful chef and one of the night's silent auction donors, Kimberley, greeted and shmoozed, shook hands and air-kissed, laughed and shared their love of creativity with the assembled. 

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The evening would not have been complete without the creative energy of Chuck Jones's daughter, Linda Jones Clough, seen here with her sons Todd and Craig along with Craig's son, Charlie.  It was a multi-generational kind-of-night!

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Special guest, Jeff Degrandis (left), producer and director of Nickelodeon's "Dora the Explorer", "Go, Diego, Go!" and other animated series, and one of Chuck's "Dover Boys", spoke lovingly about the effect Chuck's friendship and mentoring had on him and his career and life during the presentation before the live auction portion of the evening.

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Marian Jones, wife of Chuck Jones, with her friend Dickson Shafer, enjoyed the evening.

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To keep the children who joined us busy, as well as many of the adults, an art project to 'obliterate' a wall and furniture with color-form stickers was set up in one corner of the Center's new space.  It turned out beautifully and will be an ongoing project at the Center.

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Husband-and-wife-artists Patricia and Mike Peraza made the scene.  Mike is participating in the Homage to Chuck Jones series of original and limited edition work that is being created to celebrate Chuck Jones's Centennial this year.

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Writer, blogger, and cartoon historian, Jerry Beck, was one of the well-wishers, seen here with friend Yvette Kaplan.

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Jon Brown (left), co-owner of 24 carrots Catering & Events, addresses the crowd before the live auction. Thank you 24 carrots, we wouldn't be in this beautiful, new space without you!  24 carrots Catering & Events provided an outstanding series of buffet tables laden with delectable goodies from "build your own" sliders to exotic cheeses and liquid nitrogen infused popcorn (you breath fire like a dragon when you eat it!)  They even created a new drink just for this event, a Carrotini!  Everyone said it was delish.

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Robert Patrick (left) of the Center and Linda Jones Enterprises puts his head together with Phillip Trigas, architect (of RTK Architects in Culver City), and the designer of the new space for Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.  By the way, one lucky bidder will have 3 one-hour sessions with Phil as he guides them through the steps to producing an architectural rendering.  He graciously donated his time as a silent auction item.

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Neil Cantor, Managing Director of the Chuck Jones Experience at Circus Circus in Las Vegas  with his daughter, the awesome Lauren, who sold raffle tickets for us throughout the evening AND called out some of the winning numbers as well.  Thank you Neil and Lauren!  (Also, a special callout to Lauren's brother, David — not pictured — who is an incredible salesmen, you rock David!)

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Here's Craig sharing his feelings about his grandfather and creativity before the live auction.

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Here's what Craig was facing during his presentation.  Estimated attendance, 375.

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Our favorite muralist and actor, James C. Mulligan, painted throughout the evening a new mural on one of the tower entrance walls…watch this space for its completion!

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A work-in-progress…

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Collectors Louis and Sandra Lozano (2nd & 3rd from left) enjoyed their Carrotinis with the Yetsko's; Johnny (far left), John, Leigh, and Matt.  

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Artist Bob Elias with friend enjoyed the proceedings.  

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Vivienne and John Ramirez (left, John is the designer of the Chuck Jones Experience at Circus Circus in Las Vegas) with Neil Cantor and Jeff Degrandis (far right).  

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The incomparable Todd Kausen with his wonderful wife, Krista.  Todd donated a live and a silent auction item that tech nerds were all over…one involved filming a sporting event (you know there are going to be a lot of buttons to push) as well as another that included a behind-the-scenes tour of the Nokia Theater in downtown Los Angeles (more widgets & gagdets!)

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Artist, beard-grower, and all around great guy, Mike Kungl, with his charming and delightful wife, Dana, made the scene that much livelier and fun.  Mike has been working on a series of works that will be part of the Chuck Jones Centennial Homage series.  

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A special thank you and shout-out to Stephen Russo, seen here with the Center's Program Director, Pamela Marsden, who provided Chuck Redux with all of these phenomenal photos!  Thank you, Stephen!

 

Chuck Jones on the Origins of Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Let’s listen to Chuck Jones as he discusses the origins of his characters, Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote. Afterwards there’ll be a quiz, so please take notes.  

You know that’s not true, afterwards there’ll be a cartoon starring these self-same animated animals, enjoy!

 

 

It’s Raining Cartoons (not really, but wouldn’t it be wonderful if it did?)

Contrary to popular belief, it does rain in southern California.  Today is one of those days.  We couldn't think of a better way to chase away the rainy day blues than with a fab Chuck Jones cartoon.  So, without further ado, presenting the Chuck Jones directed 1959 short cartoon staring Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner…

WILD ABOUT HURRY  

Jones Family Gathering Welcomes a Special Guest!

At last night's gala dinner on the patio of Lou & Mickey's (at the very heart of San Diego's historic Gaslamp Quarter–previously known as the "Stingaree"), the Jones Family Gathering welcomed a very special guest, one of Chuck Jones's favorite authors and wits.

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This author has been gone from this world for over a century, so our 'reception' was at times a little blurry, but we kept fiddling with the knobs and dials of our "Way Back Machine" (not to be confused with Peabody & Sherman's WABAC machine), and he eventually came into clearer focus.  

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To everyone's amazement and delight it was that rascal and raconteur, the inimitable Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens).  Mr. Twain was gracious enough to stroll among us, delighting us with bits and pieces of his encyclopedic knowledge of all things west of the Mississippi (and some things east of it too!)

Chuck Jones began reading at age three and around the age of seven (circa 1919) discovered the writings of Mark Twain, in particular a book Twain wrote about his and his brother's trip by stagecoach out to the gold fields of the Sacramento basin in 1849 ("a miner, a 'forty-niner', oh my darlin' Clementine…"), titled "Roughing It".  One particular passage stuck with Chuck, and it was Twain's description of the coyote (which is repeated below for your edification); it was a description, Chuck said, that resonated with a scrawny, seven-year-old, and one that when needed about 20 years later, provided much of the characterization of one of Jones's most enduring and popular characters.  Let's see, who could that be?

Twain wrote: 

"Along about an hour after breakfast we saw the first prairie dog villages, the first antelope, and the first wolf. If I remember rightly, this latter was the regular coyote (pronounced ky-o-te) of the farther deserts. And if it was, he was not a pretty creature or respectable either, for I got well acquanited with his race afterward, and can speak with confidence.

The coyote is a long, slim, sick and sorry-looking skeleton, with a gray wolfskin stretched over it, a tolerably bushy tail that forever sags down with a despairing expression of forsakenness and misery, a furtive and evil eye, and a long, sharp face, with slightly lifted lip and exposed teeth. He has a general slinking expression all over. The coyote is a living, breathing allegory of Want. He is always hungry. He is always poor, out of luck, and friendless. The meanest creatures despise him, and even the fleas would desert him for a velocipede. He is so spirtless and cowardly that even while his exposed teeth are pretending a threat, the rest of his face is apologizing for it. And he is so homely! -so scrawny, and ribby, and coarse-haired, and pitiful."

CIRCUS CIRCUS LAS VEGAS GETS ANIMATED THIS OCTOBER WITH THE OPENING OF “THE CHUCK JONES EXPERIENCE”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                MEDIA CONTACT:  Kim Sudhalter, Urban Legend PR, 213-369-6062 or kim@urbanlegendpr.com

 HOLLYWOOD, CA, August 22, 2011 – The legacy and creativity of Chuck Jones, one of animation’s pioneering director-producers, will be brought to life with the opening of The Chuck Jones Experience, an interactive exhibit at Circus Circus Las Vegas designed to “Educate, Inspire & Entertain” people of all ages. The attraction will celebrate its grand opening in mid-October with a press conference featuring some of animation’s brightest stars.

A four-time Academy Award-recipient, Jones created some of today’s most beloved and enduring animated characters including Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner and Pepé le Pew among many others.  In 1999, with the establishment of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, Chuck Jones envisioned a time when people of all ages could explore their creativity…when all ideas would be welcome, when inspiration would be nurtured without prejudice, and creativity would blossom and grow. The Chuck Jones Experience, utilizing the art, writings and films of Jones, will nurture that spirit of creativity in an environment that is playful, lively, inspirational and educational. The project is being developed by Jones’ grandson, Craig Kausen, Jones’ daughter, Linda Jones Clough, and a group of Chuck Jones fans who have believed in and supported its creation for years.

“My grandfather said that if you provide the right materials and an environment of love, creative magic will come out of young people,” said Kausen. “The Chuck Jones Experience will provide kids, and animation fans of all ages, with an extraordinary place to not only learn about the art of animation, but to discover the creativity and magic that’s inside us all. We are thrilled to kick off Chuck’s Centennial year with the opening of this exciting new venture.”

The Chuck Jones Experience is a nearly 10,000 square-foot destination. At its entrance is the 1,000 square-foot glass-enclosed Chuck Jones Center for Creativity class room where creative art projects will be encouraged and guided by teachers from the field of animation and the arts. Heading inside, your first stop is the Chuck Jones Theatre, designed to simulate a 1930s-style movie theater. There, you’ll meet Chuck Jones via a short film, introduced by one of his characters, the Connecticut Cat.

Moving on, you’ll walk down a virtual street surrounded by many of Jones’ most memorable characters and a timeline of his extraordinary life. Next, you’ll arrive at a re-creation of Jones’ studio, where you’ll see how he worked, and discover what inspired him to create his beloved characters. From there, you‘ll enter the “How Do You Measure Up?” room where 3-D characters are on display.  You’ll learn more about how characters are developed and experience some of the original key drawings Jones drew during the creation of these characters.

Continuing along, you can view some of Jones’ fine art work from various periods in his life and see classic photos of him, his fellow animators and his family. This leads into “Animation Alley,” a multimedia wall where animation pieces are on display from the permanent collection of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and from other animation studios and collections.

Finally, you’ll arrive at the Acme Workshop, where you can create your own sound effects and voiceovers for a Chuck Jones cartoon at the Chuck Jones Experience Foley Stage. You can commemorate your experience forever at the Chuck Jones Experience Gift Shop with a variety of creative gifts and souvenirs.

“My father knew that creativity was the key to any innovation and breakthrough and therefore it must be encouraged and supported in order for society to succeed,” added Jones Clough. “It has been our family’s dream to develop locations where creativity could flourish. We established the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity in Orange County, CA, as a first step in bringing this vision to life. The opening of The Chuck Jones Experience represents a delightful next step in making creativity accessible to everyone, whether they’re visiting Las Vegas, or living nearby.”

“We are pleased to be joining forces with such a great partner as Circus Circus to make this project a reality,” continued Kausen. “Creative inspiration can be achieved in a very short time and being on vacation is a perfect time to tap into it.  Circus Circus is well known for the fun and wonderment it inspires in guests, and it’s a crossroads for travelers from around the world. These qualities make it a great location for The Chuck Jones Experience.”

The Chuck Jones Experience is an exciting addition to our assortment of family-friendly entertainment offerings at Circus Circus and we are honored to become home to such a fascinating interactive attraction,” said Don Thrasher, president and chief operating officer of Circus Circus. “This experience is unlike anything else in Las Vegas and it is certain to create hours of fun and enlightenment for guests of all ages.”

"Speaking on behalf of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, I am very excited that the programs which have been so successful here will be accessible by a much broader group of people at The Chuck Jones Experience,” said Tracy Tanner, president of the Chuck Jones Council for Creativity.

About Chuck Jones:

Chuck Jones created the legendary Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for Warner Bros. Tom & Jerry cartoons and the TV version of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas for MGM, along with many other well-known classics such as The Phantom Tollbooth, George Selden’s The Cricket in Times Square, Rudyard Kipling’s Rikki-Tikki-Tavi and The White Seal.

About Circus Circus Las Vegas

The hallmark of the 3,767-room Circus Circus Las Vegas lies under the legendary Big Top, where celebrated circus acts perform on the Midway Stage as part of the world's largest permanent circus.  The Adventuredome, America’s largest indoor theme park, offers five acres of climate-controlled fun for all ages.  Guests of Circus Circus may dine in a variety of restaurants including THE Steak House, rated the best steakhouse by Zagat and recognized a record 20 times in Las Vegas Review-Journal’s “Best of Las Vegas” awards, and Rock & Rita’s, where flair bartenders and live music enliven the scene.  Circus Circus also offers a casino, wedding chapel, meeting and convention space and a 30-acre RV park.  Circus Circus is a wholly owned subsidiary of MGM Resorts International™ (NYSE: MGM).  For more information and reservations, visit www.circuscircus.com or call toll free at (800) 634-3450 or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Surfing the Waves of Inspiration: Artist Bob Elias at Chuck Jones Big Draw

California artist and long-time Orange County resident, Bob Elias, will be a featured artist at the Chuck Jones Big Draw, Sunday, August 7th from 11 AM to 5 PM.  Throughout the day Elias will be working on a new painting of two of Chuck Jones's iconic characters, but who they are will remain between Bob and I until Sunday.  So, start excersizing your drawing arm and come down to SoCo, 3303 Hyland Avenue, Costa Mesa on Sunday, August 7th for the Chuck Jones Big Draw and see what this noted artist and surfer will be working on!  Help us set a Guinness World Record for the largest art class held in one venue, register today!

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Artist Bob Elias at the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity with his most recent painting that pays homage to an American classic, the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons created and directed by Chuck Jones.

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Bob Elias works on a painting inspired by Jones's "Duck, Rabbit, Duck" cartoon of 1953.  He says he always loved cartoons (both Warner Bros. and Disney–he's also a noted painter for the theme parks) and that growing up in the artist community of Carmel-by-the-Sea in the 1950s gave him the inspiration to pursue his calling after a storied career in the hand-painted sign business.  "Those rich, deeply pigmented paints that are used for sign painting inspire my use of color to this day," said Elias. "I had so much fun at the last Chuck Jones Big Draw talking with the children and adults about painting and my technique, that I can hardly wait for this one!"  You can find Bob every so often off the shore at San O (San Onofre Beach just south of San Clemente, California) sitting on his board waiting for the perfect wave and a little bit of inspiration.  

 

Notes on Wile E. Coyote & Road Runner

“I see nothing in the Coyote that I can’t find in almost any human being.  Most of us share his desire for something small and special, be it diamonds, doughnuts, or Road Runner.  Wile E. Coyote devotes enormous ingenuity and energy to chasing the Road Runner.  People wonder what good it would do him to catch the Road Runner, as there’s obviously very little food on that scrawny frame.  A rabbit would seem to be more nutritious prey, but Wile E. considers roadrunner to be a luxury item on the coyote’s food chain.  There are delicacies as yet unknown to the human palate, and one of them is this apparently succulent avian.   

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“A Road Runner cartoon is basically a series of separate blackout gags with an underlying structure, as the Coyote returns obsessively to the fray.  Mike Maltese and I found that we needed about eleven gags to make a film, and the trick was to proceed in a more or less orderly fashion up to a strong climax.  Gags varied considerably in length and could be as short as four seconds, as long as four minutes, or almost as long as the film itself. 

“Humor is often a series of sensible statements ending in an unexpected oddity that completely changes the meaning of the scene.

“The Road Runner did not change a lot visually over the years; he has very little personality, as he is a force.  I tell students that the secret of drawing the Road Runner is learning how to draw dust:  just draw a cloud of dust and hook a Road Runner onto it…My Road Runner is a rare case in which the animated animal is almost exactly like its living model. 

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“The Road Runner’s immortal “beep-beep” was an accidental find, inspired by the sound Paul Julian made as he blindly tried to clear a route for himself along a Termite Terrace corridor.  It seemed unimaginable to ask anybody but Paul to record this sound, so we invited him into the studio and it is his voice that is heard in every Road Runner cartoon, although Mel Blanc is given credit for it.

“Eddie Selzer [producer after Leon Schlesinger] hated the first Road Runner cartoon, Fast and Furry-ous, because it had no dialogue.  “Goddamit,” he fumed, “we pay Mel Blanc and you should use his voice.”  He sulked about it.  I told him that the film wouldn’t work with dialogue, but he persisted: I don’t give a damn if it would work or not—WE PAY MEL BLANC!”