Tag Archives: painter

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones's grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

Premiering the Fine Art of Nancy Cartwright, A Brief Q & A

The Chuck Jones Gallery is pleased to have been selected as the premier location for the debut of the original art of celebrated and renowned voice actress, Nancy Cartwright, at this year’s Comic Con International in San Diego, California.

Nancy Cartwright, the voice of Bart Simpson, in her art studio.

Nancy Cartwright, the voice of Bart Simpson, in her art studio.

In an email exchange, Ms. Cartwright answered questions posed by the Chuck Jones Gallery. Here is a sampling of that conversation:

CJG: Tell us about the early years, growing up. What part did painting and drawing play in your childhood?

NC: I was always very creative as a child. I loved coloring and painting and doing arts and crafts. I really liked doodling and also working with clay. . .but I never really considered it for a career. Music played another part in my life and by the time I was 10, I decided to play the trumpet. I wasn’t allowed to be in both music and art–I had to pick one or the other. I chose music and eventually played French horn in the concert band, the marching band, and the orchestra.

CJG: What do you feel you communicate through your paintings?

NC: Fun, beauty, aesthetics, some thought-provoking messages.

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones's grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones’s grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

CJG: Are there any major artistic influences you’d like to cite?

NC: I’ve been in the animation industry for 35 years now and my art is a reflection and homage to this art form that has served and inspired me for so long.  Being a part of the longest running scripted show in the history of television [“The Simpsons”] has completely influenced my passion for this art form.  Reverse painting has been around for thousands of years where it was widely used for religious renderings.  Much later, painting on glass influenced Renaissance art. With the invention of celluloid [a kind of plastic] in 1889, the art of animation was born.  My good friend, Dave Tourjé, is a local artist who excels in reverse painting.  His work is permanently on display in his historical home in South Pasadena that was serendipitously owned by the late artist and educator, Nelbert Chouinard.  Nelbert ran an art school that was the hub of the training that Walt Disney presented to his more inexperienced animators back in the 20s and 30s. In fact, Disney personally drove the animators to the school in his Model A so they could learn about anatomy and fine art.  This was especially helpful since it was during the development of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves”.

CJG: What is your favorite color?

NC: Coral.

"Fellini", original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

“Fellini”, original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

CJG: Why do you paint/draw?

NC: I like to create positive effects on others and this is one way to really surprise them with something they didn’t know I did!

CJG: Anything else you’d like to mention?

NC: Being invited by the Chuck Jones Gallery as a preliminary exhibition definitely needs mentioning.  I had the privilege of working with Mr. Jones on the last animation project he directed—Timberwolf.  It was for the internet and was released in 2000.  Having worked so closely with Chuck opened up a relationship with his family who owns and operates Chuck’s galleries.  I am completely thrilled and honored to be associated with one of the most-respected animation art collections in the world.

Original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

Original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

Nancy Cartwright will be the guest of the Chuck Jones Gallery as it premiers her paintings on Saturday, July 23 from 7:30 PM to 9:30 PM. RSVP is required: 619-294-9880. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Ave., in the heart of San Diego’s Gas Lamp Quarter, directly across from the Hard Rock Hotel and just one short block from the Convention Center.

 

A Still Animated Life

The Chuck Jones Gallery is pleased to present a new artist, Daniel Killen, to our collection. A local Southern Californian, Killen has worked in animation at Warner Bros. and DreamWorks on such features as “Space Jam,” “The Iron Giant,” and “Spirit: The Stallion of the Cimarron.” He’s recently created works for the gallery based on the Warner Bros. Classic Films, “The Wizard of Oz” and “A Christmas Story.”

Artist Daniel Killen

Artist Daniel Killen

Today, we’re releasing his first edition that pays homage to the legacy of Chuck Jones, “A Still Animated Life.” This fine art reproduction on canvas measures 18″ x 24″ unframed and has been created in an edition of 40 examples with 15 hand-embellished Artist Proofs. Pre-publication pricing of only $395.00 unframed for a limited time. This image takes a unconventional look at the cartoon characters made famous by Chuck Jones. Look closely to find your favorites cavorting on the picture plane. (Hint: They’re just a “shadow” of their former selves.)

 

 

Working in both traditional media and digital, Killen’s work reflects his consummate understanding of character and design. This, coupled with his droll wit and sly look at the predicaments and delights of daily life, make him an artist to watch.

 

At work on "A Still Animated Life"

At work on “A Still Animated Life”

 

The Sensational Ron Burns Paints Bugs Bunny!

The Chuck Jones Galleries are pleased to announce that art superstar, Ron Burns, he of the neon-colored dogs and cats, is working on new original work utilizing the characters created and developed by Chuck Jones. His first work, a portrait of Bugs Bunny, is on the easel; you'll be able to follow his progress by clicking here

Over 20 years ago,
artist Ron Burns picked up a paint brush for the first time and started
painting as a release from the corporate world where he was running his Los
Angeles based marketing and design studio.  It was only a couple of years
later, in his quest to find what truly inspired him, that he looked down into
the eyes of his newly rescued puppy Rufus that began his fine art career of
painting bright, colorful, loving dogs.

It
wasn't until he sold a few paintings of the family four-legged-kids, that his
wife, Buff, said she could no longer part with the paintings and so, once more,
Ron found himself looking for inspiration.  He found it next, when taking
a trip to the local animal shelter while on vacation in Aspen.  After
painting several of the dogs and selling the paintings, he donated a percentage
back to the shelter beginning what Ron calls, Art is Going to the Dogs.

He might have remained content
painting only shelter dogs, but on September 11, 2001 after taking his morning
run, he turned on the TV to see the world change forever.  As he watched
the events unfold he saw the story of Sirius, the explosive-detection dog that
lost his life in Tower II.  He reached out to David Lim his handler which
lead to the painting of Sirius and then on to meeting pet therapy dogs and
search and rescue dogs involved in the tragedy.

Since
then Ron has painted numerous dogs that have survived insurmountable odds, dogs
that devote their lives through their service to humans as well as continuing
to portray the beauty of rescued dogs and the much loved family member.

His
work has been seen throughout the media world from CNN to Time magazine,
collected around the world and honored by various awards.  It is now fair
to say that he has accomplished what few artists have; and that is an art
movement.  Today artists around the world see his art and are inspired to
paint like Burns.  Who could ever have imagined, that looking down into
his best friend furever's eyes could have changed his life so drastically as
well as the art world.

Don't forget to follow Ron's progress as he paints everyone's favorite cartoon rabbit, Bugs Bunny!

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How Creativity Works (sometimes)

Chuck Redux stumbled across this poem by Frank O'Hara, one of mid-century America's great poets and critics, the other day, as one does when surfing the internet and over the intervening days as it has sunk in and had time to percolate, CR has come to think of it as a poem about the nature of creativity and thinks you will too.

Why I Am Not A Painter

I am not a painter, I am a poet.
Why? I think I would rather be
a painter, but I am not. Well,

for instance, Mike Goldberg
is starting a painting. I drop in.
“Sit down and have a drink” he
says. I drink; we drink. I look
up. “You have SARDINES in it.”
“Yes, it needed something there.”
“Oh.” I go and the days go by
and I drop in again. The painting
is going on, and I go, and the days
go by. I drop in. The painting is
finished. “Where’s SARDINES?”
All that’s left is just
letters, “It was too much,” Mike says.

But me? One day I am thinking of
a color: orange. I write a line
about orange. Pretty soon it is a
whole page of words, not lines.
Then another page. There should be
so much more, not of orange, of
words, of how terrible orange is
and life. Days go by. It is even in
prose, I am a real poet. My poem
is finished and I haven’t mentioned
orange yet. It’s twelve poems, I call
it ORANGES. And one day in a gallery
I see Mike’s painting, called SARDINES

ACME Quicksand, the Tool Drawer, and a Spiny Frog

Chuck Jones Homage artist, Bob Elias, dropped by the other day to show us his progress on a new painting he's been working on of Road Runner with Wile E. Coyote mired in a puddle of ACME Quicksand.

"The Coyote is a history of my own frustration and war with all tools, multiplied only slightly. I can remember my wife and daughter would start to weep bitterly and seek hiding places whenever they saw me head toward the tool drawer, if only to hang a picture. I have never reached into that devilish drawer without starting a chain of errors and disasters of various but inevitable proportions. Like any other man, I would rather succeed in what I can't do than do what I have successfully done before. I have never reached into that drawer without encountering one of those spiny things you stick flowers in. We don't keep that thing in that drawer, but it is always there. I count it a good day when I get only one spine under a fingernail. I tried to get the spiny thing out of the drawer once, but found out that the last time, when it had stuck to four fingers at once and had been lifted a few inches out of its next in the resulting shriek, it had fallen on a tube of glue, puncturing the tube and affixing itslef to the drawer for all time. I have tried lackadaisicallly from time to time to remove it, and have succeeded in breaking a rattail file, a kitchen knife, three fingernails, a nailfile, a pair of manicure scissors, an eggbeater (in one of my more fanciful efforts), and a window, when the tail of the rattail file separated from the rattail file." –Chuck Jones, writing in his 1989 autobiography, "Chuck Amuck, the Life and Times of a Animated Cartoonist"

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Chuck Jones Homage artist Bob Elias on the left with this blog's author posing with a painting of quicksand that also includes Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. And yes, you're not mistaken, those are Christmas decorations hanging up above our heads. We would have taken them down sooner, but decided that we liked their resemblance to planets and outer space, so left them until just the other day, when they finally were removed and stored for another time. Time is relative, is it not?

P.S. What did this post have to do with spiny frogs? Leave a comment if you think you know why. Who knows the first person to answer correctly may win something! 

Trevor Carlton: The Secrets of a Professional Artist

Have you ever wondered what it must be like to be a professional artist?  Is it all berets and filterless French cigarettes and double shots of espresso and an unexplainable cough and nubile nudes posing for you under the north-facing skylight in your garrett atelier or is it something else entirely?

You'll have the chance to find out on Sunday, August 7th, at the Chuck Jones Big Draw as artist Trevor Carlton shares his secrets and the ins and outs of working professionally as an artist.  

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Trevor, a native of Olympia, Washington, started painting in high school, but his first love was the stage and he went on to study acting at his local college, and then at the Lee Strasberg Acting Workshop in Los Angeles where he pursued his acting career.  But, as happens with actors, he paid the bills by working in a custom furniture store specializing in faux finishes.  His signature style was developed here.

Using reclaimed lumber as his canvas, he started painting images of vintage Americana with subjects ranging from pop icon celebrities to jazz greats.  More recently he has been commissioned by Disney Studios to create limited edition artwork utilizing their characters in his unique style.  

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At the Chuck Jones Big Draw, Trevor will be speaking with anyone who wants to know more about the challenges and rewards of becoming a professional artist.  Also, along with his friend and painting partner, Stephen Reis, he will be creating a very special performance piece later in the afternoon.  Stick around for it–it's a terrific experience!   

The Chuck Jones Big Draw, Sunday, August 7th from 11 AM to 5 PM at South Coast Collection, 3303 Hyland Avenue (next to Paul Mitchell) in Costa Mesa, California.  Help us set a Guinness World Record for the largest art class held in one venue beginning promptly at 2 PM.  For more details and to register go to EventComplete.   "Like" us on Facebook at The Chuck Jones Big Draw!

Image of the Day: Trick or Treat

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Now, that's scary!!  Happy Halloween, everyone!

"Trick or Treat" a limited edition hand-painted cel.  Chuck Jones's original line drawing was transferred to an acetate sheet and hand-painted by expert cel painters.*  

 

*Cel painters: there are so few left in the world, they are truly an endangered species!

Chuck Jones: On Painting with Oils

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"Working in oils comes the closest to bridging the painter to the sculptor.  Oil paints are tactile unlike watercolors–the touch and movement of the brush on the canvas is sensuous and treacherous.  Your mistakes are as meaningful as your triumphs–like making love.  It takes an unruly mind to find the unique discipline peculiar to each painter."  –Chuck Jones