Tag Archives: One Froggy Evening

How to Celebrate 100 Years of Joy! Chuck Jones Film Festival at the Alex Theatre

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Order your tickets today by clicking the image above or visiting the Alex Theatre website, AlexTheatre.org.   

The Chuck Jones Centennial Celebration Film Festival will be an evening devoted to honoring the artist who brought to life such famous cartoon characters as Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner, Pepé le Pew, Marvin Martian, and Marc Anthony. Hosted by the family of Chuck Jones, the evening will include reminiscences from noted artists* whose careers and lives have been impacted by Chuck Jones and the work he created.

Of course, there will be cartoons, many of them from Jones' personal 35mm collection. Chuck Jones, whose credits include four Academy Award-winning short films, directed over 300 films in his lifetime, with such memorable titles as "Rabbit Seasoning?", "Robin Hood Daffy", and "Feed the Kitty".  In 1992 his "What's Opera, Doc?" was the first short animated film to be inducted into the Library of Congress' National Film Registry, subsequently two others have been added, "One Froggy Evening" and "Duck Amuck".  Jones, an honorary lifetime member of the Director's Guild, is considered to be one of the pioneers of the animated film, feted and honored at dozens of International Film Festivals from Annecy to Zagreb.  In 1985 Jones was the subject of a film retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.  In 1999, Jones founded the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, a non-profit public charity whose vision is to inspire the innate creative genius within each person that leads to a more joyous, passionate, and harmonious life and world.

Join the Jones family (Marian, Linda, Craig, Todd, and Valerie) as they welcome our special guests, including:

*Carl Bell, animator and clean-up artist, will be one of the presenters. A Governor of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Bell worked with Jones in the late 1960s and early 1970s at MGM. His career includes work with Clampett Productions early in his career and most recently with Disney Studios.

*Eric Goldberg:  Eric Goldberg joined Disney Studios in 1990 as the supervising animator responsible for the movements, personality and soul of the Genie in Aladdin.  Goldberg's strong background in animation next earned him his directorial debut on Pocahontas, which he followed up as the supervising animator on Phil, the salty satyr and trainer of heroes in Hercules.  Goldberg also directed the "Carnival of the Animals" and "Rhapsody in Blue" segments ofFantasia 2000, the continuation of Walt Disney's 1940 masterpiece.Goldberg not only served as the director of animation for Warner Bros.' 2003 live-action and animation hybrid feature "Looney Tunes: Back in Action," but he also provided the voices of the cartoon characters Marvin Martian, Tweety and Speedy Gonzalez.  Working with Bob Kurtz of Kurtz + Friends, he animated the title sequence of MGM's 2006 remake of "The Pink Panther".  His relationship with Chuck Jones began in the early 1990s and continued until Jones' passing in 2002.

*Jerry Beck is an animation historian, author, blogger, animation producer and industry consultant to Warner Bros. Studios and has been an executive with Nickelodeon and Disney. 

More names of presenters as they become available.

The Alex Theatre is located at 216 North Brand Boulevard, Glendale, CA 91203. The phone number is 818-243-ALEX (2539).

Chuck Jones Centennial Celebration of Animation at the Newport Beach Film Festival 2012

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, a Newport Beach Film Festival Event Sponsor, will be hosting a morning of Chuck Jones animated cartoons at Triangle Square, Costa Mesa (at the intersection of Newport Blvd., 19th St., and the terminus of the 55 freeway) on Saturday, April 28th at 11 AM. Among the many favorite short cartoons to be shown will be one of his masterpieces, "One Froggy Evening."

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Following the showing at 1:30 PM will be a panel discussion and seminar on animation with celebrated voice actress, June Foray (Rocky the Flying Squirrel, Natasha Fatale, and Witch Hazel); Emmy Award-winning producer Linda Jones Clough; "Dora the Explorer" producer and director, Jeff DeGrandis; animation director, character designer ("Hop"), and writer, Chris Bailey and photographer Marian Jones, Chuck Jones's widow. The discussion will be moderated by Craig Kausen, chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.

A ticket for both events is $5.00 for adults. For more information and to purchase tickets, please contact the Newport Beach Film Festival by clicking on their name in this sentence or on the images. 

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Chuck Jones Center for Creativity Welcomes Guest Film Curator

This just could not wait another minute…

The Guest Curator page on the soon-to-be-brand-new-exciting-and-thrilling Chuck Jones Center for Creativity website will be devoted to commentary provided by a variety of experts and fans of the art and films of Chuck Jones.  Throughout this series, we plan to bring you new insight and fresh perspectives on Jones's oeuvre.  Stay tuned!

Animation expert, author, and historian, Jerry Beck, graciously agreed to inaugurate the Guest Curator page on the Center's website, but due to a delay in launching that brand-new-exciting-and-thrilling-website, we've decided to share his insights with you today here at Chuck Redux.  Selecting three Chuck Jones cartoons to highlight proved a challenge, but one he met with his usual gusto, delight, and expertise.   Read on! 

ONE FROGGY EVENING – Chuck Jones probably never set out to create a classic when he began directing this one-shot cartoon (originally titled “It Hopped One Night”), but that’s exactly what he did. Michael Maltese’s premise, about a singing frog that performs only in view of its owner, must have appealed to Chuck for its witty use of popular tunes from an earlier generation, and a story told virtually through pantomime, poses and facial expressions.
 
But it turned out to be (in my humble opinion) his greatest piece of animation storytelling, where every subtle nuance conveys feelings we can all relate to, including happiness, greed, frustration and failure. One Froggy Evening plays upon our desire to achieve the American Dream of easy success, and finds humor in the realities of how that success may or may not be obtained. Jones’ animation unit at this time was at the height of its talents, producing cartoons as contemporary as the UPA shorts, as timeless as Disney, and utterly original on their own terms. A masterpiece!
Unfortunately, One Froggy Evening is only available by hyperlink, click on the title in this sentence to watch the cartoon.
 
OPERATION RABBIT – The best cartoon characters represent identifiable personalities that are either who we are – or who we want to be. Operation Rabbit presents the eternal battle between those two forces. Bugs Bunny has always been smarter than his various adversaries (think Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam and Taz), but here he encounters his brainest foe – a “genius” in fact – Wile E. Coyote.
 
Jones concocted the coyote as the personification of his own bewilderment with tools, machinery or simply building things. He knew how funny this sort of character could be up against the cool, calm and confident Bugs, just as he was in his debut film versus the Road Runner two years earlier.
 
Operation Rabbit is Wile E.’s second screen appearance and his first speaking role (not to mention the first time the character is named). I personally think its one of the best Bugs Bunny cartoons ever made and debatably the funniest. The scene of the coyote hanging on a rock ledge, having just been blown to bits by a train hitting his nitro glycerin shack, repeating his name “Wile E. Coyote, Super-Genius” – that never fails to make me laugh out loud. I know that guy. He’s me, he’s Chuck and he’s probably you.
 
Unlike the Coyote, Jones hit the Bullseye with this one!
 

SCAREDY CAT – Scaredy Cat is the first of several Porky Pig and Sylvester “Gothics”, three cartoons Jones made with a similarly eerie premise, and one of my all-time favorites. This one has the pair spending a hair raising night in an old dark house. The humor comes from Sylvester’s observations and actions to protect an oblivious Porky from a legion of killer mice.
 
Every director at Warners had their shot to work with Porky and Sylvester and each succeeded in creating an individual persona for the characters. Jones’ Porky is never more appealing than he is here – optimistic, self-assured and quite a strict pet owner. Sylvester is also tweaked in a Jonesian way: silent and scared, paranoid yet uncharacteristically brave. Oh, and I also believe this is the first cartoon where the cat (unnamed in previous screen appearances under Clampett, Davis and McKimson – and dubbed “Thomas” in Freleng’s Oscar winning “Tweetie Pie”) is given his proper name, Sylvester.
 
That sound like something Jones and Maltese would make up for this speech-impaired putty tat. “Sufferin’ Succotash!”

 

Chuck Jones Takes Flight at the Portland Airport

The works of Northwest legendary cartoon artist, and world-renowned anima-producer at Warner Bros., Chuck Jones, are now on display at Portland International Airport. Born in Spokane, Washington, Jones’ career spanned the history of animated films, beginning at Warner Bros. and continuing his work at MGM before establishing his own Chuck Jones Enterprises in 1963.

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Photo courtesy Port of Portland

Jones' colorful and magical masterpieces of liveliness display his innate creative genius.  His most poplular works include "The Dot and the Line", "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" and "The Phantom Tollbooth."  He is perhaps best known for his timeless work at Warner Bros. such as "What's Opera, Doc?", "Duck Amuck" and "One Froggy Evening."  

Greeting the traveler’s eye, Jones’ exhibit, located along Concourse A, brings to life his youthful spirit and sharp wit. Jones’ work speaks to the inner-child of many travelers, and highlights more than 60 years of cartoon and animation history. Jones was a prolific artist whose work has been exhibited at galleries and museums worldwide. He has directed more than 300 animated films, won three Oscars in his career, and received the Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 1996.

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Photo courtesy Port of Portland

"Painting does what we cannot do—it brings a three-dimensional world into a two-dimensional plane,” said Jones, who expressed himself in many different ways through his work.

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The work is part of the rotating art exhibits program at PDX and is on loan from the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity through March 2012. More information about Jones is available at www.ChuckJonesCenter.org.

The PDX art program is designed to showcase the dynamic cultural life in the Pacific Northwest and showcase Northwest expression through ongoing relationships with regional artists, arts organizations, museums and educational institutions.

More information about PDX is available at www.pdx.com.

 

Digital Media Maven, Kim Komando, on “One Froggy Evening” Cartoon

Digital media maven and radio personality, Kim Komando, recently selected Chuck Jones's 1955 masterpiece, the animated short film "One Froggy Evening" as her favorite cartoon of all time.  Citing Steven Spielberg "The "Citizen Kane" of animated film" and the National Film Registry "culturally significant", Komando calls it a "wonderful classic."  (Of course, we agree!)  Thank you Kim, for the rave and for your love of Chuck Jones cartoons!  To watch the cartoon and read her post click on Kim Komando.  To visit Kim's website, click here.  

Image of the Day: One Froggy Evening

 

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Earliest known original model drawing by Chuck Jones for his 1955 masterpiece, "One Froggy Evening."  Graphite on 12 field two-hole punch animation paper.  Warner Bros. Animation Studio stopped using the two-hole punched paper circa 1953, two years before the release of this National Film Registry selection (of course, it's possible that there was two-hole punched paper used as scrap after the transition to three-hole punch paper, but note that it took, on average, 10 months to complete a 6-8 minute short film.) 

Image of the Day: One Froggy Evening

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Original production background, layout by Robert Gribbroek, backgrounds painted by Philip DeGuard, from the Chuck Jones directed 1955 short animated film, “One Froggy Evening.”  One of three short films by Jones inducted into the National Film Registry of the Smithosonian (the other two are “What’s Opera, Doc?” and “Duck Amuck”) it bowed in theaters on December 31, 1955 (what a New Year’s Eve surprise!)

Opening tonight with a gala reception, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presents “Chuck Jones: An Animator’s Life From A to Z-Z-Z-Z.”  The exhibit closes August 22, 2010.  For more information, visit the Oscars!