Tag Archives: musings

Love Is in the Hare…

GICLEE-29.72dpi copy
"Hand kissing.  This is something I took up when I realized its character and intent.  A girl is a continuous thing, and it isn't because the hand-bone is connected to the arm-bone, the arm-bone is connected to the head-bone.  The skin of a girl's hand is connected by direct route and direct wire to her lips, the hand is like holding the end of a lariat, the business part is at the end.  So when the continental gallant kisses a girl's hand he is in effect saying what every sane woman wants to hear: "I'd like to kiss your lips." Shaking hands is just silly, whoever heard of shaking lips?"   

"The purpose of making films is to delight.  The purpose of making films is to excite.  The purpose of making films is to have fun. Not a bad set of rules for marriage–which needs some sensible rules.  Do these rules apply only to your expected audience? No, they only apply to you."

"The weaker sex is actually the stronger sex because of the stronger sex's weakness for the weaker sex."

–Chuck Jones, "Stroke of Genius: A Collection of Paintings and Musings on Love, Life, and Art"

Stroke of Genius: A Collection of Paintings & Musings on Life, Love and Art by Chuck Jones


This coffee-table art book is 'Chuck-ful' of delightful
paintings and pithy quotes from America's master of animation.  With
insightful forewords by his wife Marian and daughter Linda (accompanied by his
portraits of each) "Stroke of Genius" delivers a refreshing take on
the Mark Twain of cartoons.  With over 50 oil paintings depicting the
characters Jones created or developed with the other animators at Warner Bros.,
the book gives you the opportunity to witness his off-camera style and
sensibility.  Although the quotes were chosen for their content and then
paired with a painting, many deliver a one-two punch of appropriateness — for
instance, an oil painting depicting Daffy cavorting in a sea of gold and jewels
is accompanied by a quote "Be yourself is about the worst advice you can
give some people."  Repeated viewings of "Stroke of Genius"
do not dim the delight one receives from Jones' astute commentary and masterful
painting style.  This book is a must have for the art connoisseur, the
avid cinephile and those who remember the Warner Bros. cartoons as some of the
happiest moments of their lives. A bonus feature is the flip book design
element that travels up and down the outside edge of the pages—a truly
innovative touch that firmly grounds the book in the fine art of