Tag Archives: Looney Tunes

The Playful God of a Manic Valhalla

In tomorrow’s New York Times, a wonderful art review by Ken Johnson of the exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image, “What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones”. An excellent read! (Click the image to read the article.)

Drawings from “What’s Opera, Doc?,” a 1957 parody of “The Ring Cycle,” are in the Chuck Jones exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image. Credit Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Drawings from “What’s Opera, Doc?,” a 1957 parody of “The Ring Cycle,” are in the Chuck Jones exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image. Credit Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Chuck 101 Film Festival at the Egyptian Theater–Hollywood

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity held Chuck 101 yesterday at Hollywood’s historic 91 year-old Egyptian Theater. The day started with Center-sponsored art projects in the courtyard.

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There was mask-making and drawing, led by our talented team of teaching artists, including the Center’s resident teaching artist, Christopher Scardino; the Sleeper Sisters, Debbie & Jennifer; Doug Lothers and Darrell Park. Sasha Advani, the Center’s program director had organized the activities.

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The art classes were followed by a screening of the Chuck Jones feature film, “The Phantom Tollbooth” (1970).The film was from Chuck’s personal collection of 35mm films. Before the screening, a Q & A with the indomitable Ms. June Foray, the voice actress known for her adept talent and wonderful acting ability. Ms. Foray was feted in the lobby for 96th birthday.

DSC06883Carrot cake cupcakes, of course!

DSC06900That evening, the Center brought over a dozen of Chuck’s short Looney Tunes cartoons to share with a full house — a portion of ticket sales went to the programs of the Center. Before the screening, though, major donors and supporters of the Center were feted in the Spielberg lobby with hors d’oeuvres and cocktails.

DSC06902From left: Craig Kausen, chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and Chuck’s grandson; Maddie Andre; Steve Fossati, Dina Andre, and Chris Bailey.

DSC06904Valerie Kausen, Chuck’s granddaughter is seen here with producer David Wong.

DSC06905Linda Jones Clough, Chuck’s daughter and founding member of the Board of Trustees smiles with her adoring fans, (r. to l.) Jim (husband), Dave, and Louis.

DSC06906Cynthia Damiano, a Center donor and supporter takes a breather from the festivities.

DSC06907The inimitable George Daugherty, creator, conductor, and producer of the film and live music extravaganza, “Bugs Bunny at the Symphony” is seen here with Marian Jones, Chuck’s widow, and her friend, Bev White.

DSC06908From left: Ashley & Kevin Mangusing with John and Doris Rendine.

DSC06910Chuck Jones Gallery art consultant, Erin Liddell (left) with collectors and friends, the Milligan’s.

DSC06911Singer and actress, Juliana Hansen with her main squeeze, artist and pirate, James C. Mulligan.

DSC06915The Spielberg Lobby at Grauman’s Egyptian Theater. Follow American Cinematheque on Twitter @sidgrauman.

DSC06916Michael Wedaa with Linda and Jim Clough. Chuck Redux apologizes for forgetting to write down Michael’s date’s name. Our bad.

DSC06922One of the many wonderful, beautiful, and charming volunteers from American Cinematheque. The Center thanks Gwen, Grant, and their entire group for the lovely assistance they provided us yesterday.

DSC06924The Chuck Jones family from right: Craig Kausen, Linda Jones Clough, Valerie Kausen, and Todd Kausen.

DSC06925Before the lights went down on the evening’s program, Chuck Redux snapped a photo of the Art Deco ceiling in the theater. Stunning!

DSC06933A full house enjoys cartoons by Chuck Jones. The shorts were interspersed with remembrances of Chuck Jones from all of his family and from special guests, Leonard Maltin, Charles Solomon, John Schulman, George Daugherty, and David Wong.

Watch this space for details regarding Chuck 102, scheduled for Chuck’s birthday, September 21, 2014 at a theater near you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Egyptian Theater Gets Looney with Chuck Jones!

Terrific article by Susan King in today’s Los Angeles Times about the upcoming film tribute on Chuck Jones’s 101st birthday, Saturday, September 21 at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood. She writes in part:

Linda Jones considered herself “incredibly lucky” to have had a father like Chuck Jones, the Oscar-winning animation director of Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies fame.

“He was probably the best father anybody could have,” said Linda Jones, an only child. “His father had a difficult time being a father, and he vowed he would never impose that kind of difficulty and challenge on a child.”

Her dad, she said, “was pretty much a 9 to 5 guy. He didn’t bring his work home with him.” Follow this link to read entire article.

LA Times 9162013

The Best of Chuck Jones’ Looney Tunes at the Sonoma Film Festival

If you live in the bay area, the Sonoma Film Festival opens today and runs through Sunday. On Saturday, April 13 at 9:30 AM PDT, the festival will present the a collection of Chuck Jones cartoons curated from his own personal collection of 35mm reels. This showcase of diverse and eclectic classics includes Oscar-winning DOT & THE LINE, ALI BABA BUNNY, and WHAT'S OPERA, DOC? (voted the greatest animated short film in history.) Adults and children will be entertainted by Bugs Bunny, Elmer Fudd, Daffy Duck, Road Runner, Wile E.Coyote, Pepe le Pew, Porky Pig, Sylvester the Cat, Gossamer, and many more! Chuck Jones's daughter, Linda, will introduce the collection and be available for discussion after the screening.

Although tickets are no longer available online, please contact the Festival Box Office for availability at SonomaFilmFest.org

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Linda Jones Clough with her father, Oscar-winning animation director and creator, Chuck Jones.

Are You Going to the Grand Opening at the Cartoon Art Museum?

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Original layout drawing by Chuck Jones for "The Bugs Bunny TV Show" circa 1961.

Tomorrow night, March 23rd from 6 to 9 PM PDT, the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and the Cartoon Art Museum present the grand opening of the exhibition, "Chuck Jones: Drawing on Imagination, 100 Years of an Animated Artist. 100 works of art from his early career through his last projects are presented in this retrospective of the genius of Chuck Jones. You'll meet some very hip people: Linda Jones Clough, daughter of Chuck Jones; Marian Jones, his widow; and Craig Kausen, his grandson. You'll also have the opportunity to visit with some old friends such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Marvin Martian, Wile E. Coyote, and the Road Runner. Tickets, from $10.00 to $50.00, are available by clicking here or at the door. The Cartoon Art Museum is located at 655 Mission St. in the SoMA Arts District of San Francisco. Call 1-415-CAR-TOON for more details. Be there or be square!

“What’s Up Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones” at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

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Robin Miller, writing in Sunday's "The Advocate" (the daily newspaper in Baton Rouge, Louisiana), interviewed Craig Kausen, chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and Chuck Jones's grandson. She begins the interview: 

"You stand among Bugs and Daffy and Porky and Pepe.

"Ah, yes, The ever-romantic Pepe Le Pew, who has been a part of your life since, well, when? Since you can remember — really remember — laughing? Since you first watched the fuse blow up in Wile E. Coyote’s face while the Roadrunner zooms by?

"Or could it be the realization that though the characters and gags haven’t changed through the years, your understanding of them has? That’s when it hits you, when you realize Chuck Jones’ Looney Tunes characters are a part of your life. No, it runs deeper than that. They’re as much a part of you as they are Craig Kausen." To read the entire article, click here or on the image above. 

“What’s Up Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones” at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

STYLE GUIDE -MISC-2 copy
Robin Miller, writing in Sunday's "The Advocate" (the daily newspaper in Baton Rouge, Louisiana), interviewed Craig Kausen, chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and Chuck Jones's grandson. She begins the interview: 

"You stand among Bugs and Daffy and Porky and Pepe.

"Ah, yes, The ever-romantic Pepe Le Pew, who has been a part of your life since, well, when? Since you can remember — really remember — laughing? Since you first watched the fuse blow up in Wile E. Coyote’s face while the Roadrunner zooms by?

"Or could it be the realization that though the characters and gags haven’t changed through the years, your understanding of them has? That’s when it hits you, when you realize Chuck Jones’ Looney Tunes characters are a part of your life. No, it runs deeper than that. They’re as much a part of you as they are Craig Kausen." To read the entire article, click here or on the image above. 

Find Your “Paradise Season” This Saturday at the Chuck Jones Gallery, San Diego

Please join us in welcoming Disney matte painter and artist, James Coleman, this Saturday, April 7 from 5 to 8 PM at the Chuck Jones Gallery in San Diego's historic Gas Lamp District. This is Coleman's first gallery show in San Diego and we're thrilled to premier his first work starring Chuck Jones's Looney Tunes characters, "Paradise Season". Coleman, world renowned for his depiction of the Hawaiian Islands, has transported the characters made famous by Chuck Jones to an island idyll, complete with surfboards, leis, and Mai Tais.  It's enough to make you drop everything and get on a plane to join them! 

Paradise season copyright

To enjoy his work first hand, stop by the gallery Saturday, April 7th from 5 to 8 PM (or sooner) and meet this wonderful artist and get to know his work first-hand. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, at the gateway to the entertaining and lively Gas Lamp District. 

Crossing 5th avenue
The Chuck Jones Gallery art consultants head to work (from left: Micah Murray, Kate Bowerman, Dave Hausmann, Erin Liddell, Joel Shapiro, and gallery director, Mike Dicken.)

 

Grim Natwick Writes a Letter to Chuck Jones

Chuck Jones's first film that he directed (noted as 'supervisor' in the credits) was "The Night Watchman" of 1938.  His promotion to supervisor was noted in Daily Variety and other industry publications and the congratulatory letters poured in.   As we're preparing for the exhibition of art and artifacts from his life at the Chuck Jones Experience at Circus Circus Las Vegas, we've found some really wonderful, and oftentimes quite touching, notes and letters sent to Chuck on the occasion of his promotion, which at age 26 made him one of the youngest directors at Leon Schlesinger Studios.  The letter below is from the venerable Grim Natwick, who not only offered his expert guidance to the young Jones as he began his career in animation, but is also known for his talent at drawing the human form (he is responsible for bringing Snow White to life for Walt Disney.)

LETTER TO CHUCK FROM GRIM NATWICK IN 4-7-1938 ENVELOPE copy
The envelope is dated April 17, 1938.

Dear Chuck, 

Somebody told me you got a very important blurb in Variety to the effect that you are a Supervisor in charge of Looney Tunes — I believe — Have not seen the issue but my informer seemed to stress its importance so I am acting on that report.  Let me be the last to congratulate you.  You must be doing all right and that is enough to make me very happy — Grim N-

A Couple of Fine Lines: “Debonair” & “Au Contraire”

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From the hand of master animator and director, Eric Goldberg ("Looney Tunes: Back in Action!", "The Princess and the Frog") the Chuck Jones Galleries are pleased to present this exquisite pair of fine art serigraphs on paper.  Goldberg's innovative take on the classic characters immortalized by the legendary Chuck Jones strikes a balance between the classical world of fine art and the delightfully zany world of the animated film.  

 

Hand-cut, hand-pulled and printed at one of America's premier serigraph workshops, "Debonair" (Bugs Bunny) and "Au Contraire" (Daffy Duck) represent the acme of this centuries-old printing process.   Goldberg's beautifully rendered ink line has been carefully reproduced in an edition of 150 (18" x 10" printed on archival cotton rag paper) with 25 Artist Proofs (30.5" x 18" printed on fine hand-made Japanese rice paper.) 
Call today for more information and to reserve your "Debonair" & "Au Contraire" for your collection.  Also available online by clicking here.