Tag Archives: creative

The Sensational Ron Burns Paints Bugs Bunny!

The Chuck Jones Galleries are pleased to announce that art superstar, Ron Burns, he of the neon-colored dogs and cats, is working on new original work utilizing the characters created and developed by Chuck Jones. His first work, a portrait of Bugs Bunny, is on the easel; you'll be able to follow his progress by clicking here

Over 20 years ago,
artist Ron Burns picked up a paint brush for the first time and started
painting as a release from the corporate world where he was running his Los
Angeles based marketing and design studio.  It was only a couple of years
later, in his quest to find what truly inspired him, that he looked down into
the eyes of his newly rescued puppy Rufus that began his fine art career of
painting bright, colorful, loving dogs.

wasn't until he sold a few paintings of the family four-legged-kids, that his
wife, Buff, said she could no longer part with the paintings and so, once more,
Ron found himself looking for inspiration.  He found it next, when taking
a trip to the local animal shelter while on vacation in Aspen.  After
painting several of the dogs and selling the paintings, he donated a percentage
back to the shelter beginning what Ron calls, Art is Going to the Dogs.

He might have remained content
painting only shelter dogs, but on September 11, 2001 after taking his morning
run, he turned on the TV to see the world change forever.  As he watched
the events unfold he saw the story of Sirius, the explosive-detection dog that
lost his life in Tower II.  He reached out to David Lim his handler which
lead to the painting of Sirius and then on to meeting pet therapy dogs and
search and rescue dogs involved in the tragedy.

then Ron has painted numerous dogs that have survived insurmountable odds, dogs
that devote their lives through their service to humans as well as continuing
to portray the beauty of rescued dogs and the much loved family member.

work has been seen throughout the media world from CNN to Time magazine,
collected around the world and honored by various awards.  It is now fair
to say that he has accomplished what few artists have; and that is an art
movement.  Today artists around the world see his art and are inspired to
paint like Burns.  Who could ever have imagined, that looking down into
his best friend furever's eyes could have changed his life so drastically as
well as the art world.

Don't forget to follow Ron's progress as he paints everyone's favorite cartoon rabbit, Bugs Bunny!


Critical Opinions on Chuck Jones’s Work

We're in the midst of a big scanning project here, digitizing press and publicity from the past couple of decades so that we can share it with you at some point in the future as a resource on ChuckJonesCenter.org. Today, a sheet of paper, a photocopy really, surfaced that had a series of comments from a variety of writers, historians, and critics about the work of Chuck Jones. They're just too wonderful not to share them with you now. 

"Chuck Jones is considered by many to be no less than a seminal figure in the development of the animated film." –Alex Ward, Washington Post

"He has made moviegoers laugh as often and as well as Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. His work is among the best of American film comedy." —Jay Cocks, TIME Magazine

"Chuck Jones is a worldly-wise child who knows animation downside up and outside in and can also do a perfect imitation of a cat swimming…" –Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek Magazine

"[With animation becoming a vital part of modern cinema] is Chuck Jones the real successor to Walt Disney? Many knowledgeable observers of the scene think so." –Dr. Richard MacCann, Professor, University of Kansas in an introduction to an evening with Chuck Jones at the University in 1967.

University of Kansas Jayhawker 1967 cropped copy

"I may get an argument from people franticallly pointing at light bulbs, but yesterday I met the greatest inventor in the world, a man far greater than Edison–and funnier–Chuck Jones…" –Herbert Lockwood, San Diego Daily Transcript

"Since Jones never made topical jokes, his stuff remains, like all good fables and only the best art, both timeless and universal." –Peter Bogdonavich, Film Director, writing in Esquire Magazine

"For more than a generation, Chuck Jones has been one of the most imaginative and accomplished film makers in the America…" –Jeff Simon, Buffalo Evening News

The Big Kaboom: Artist Tennessee Loveless and His Triumph Over Color-Blindness

Celebrating the Chuck Jones Centennial, the Chuck Jones Gallery has reached out to many talented artists asking them to create works of art that pay homage to Jones's creativity and genius. We've worked with such artistic luminaries as James Coleman and Mike Kungl, and this week released a new edition, "The Big Kaboom" (pictured below) from the young tyro, Tennessee Loveless.

TLLE001-1 The Big Kaboom 24 x 24 copy
Overcoming a handicap that might have deterred someone of weaker character, Loveless, in the accompanying video, describes how he has met the challenge of severe color-blindness, using it instead as a springboard for his creative vision. 

Daffy Duck 75? Not Possible, Why He Doesn’t Look a Day Over…

On April 17, 1937, a star was born. Tex Avery's "Porky's Duck Hunt" premiered in theaters nationwide and audiences were introduced to a duck unlike any other duck in cartoon history. He was wacky and wild, some might even say crazy, but the germ of an idea was born, and the directors and animators at Warner Bros. took the nutty, black-feathered guy and made him into the star he is today, Daffy Aloysius Dumas Duck. 

Daffy Duck starred in 134 +/- cartoons and arguably reached his apogee in the hunting trilogy directed by Chuck Jones: "Rabbit Fire" 1951, "Rabbit Seasoning" 1952, and "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!" 1953. 

"I have watched with fascination his [Daffy's] growth from his earliest haphazard puerile personality, through adolescence, to the splendid bombast of his maturity in the fifties. Daffy has become the spokesman for the egoist in everyone, but he remains always undaunted by the inevitable requital: the fear of consequences that makes cowards of the rest of us." –Robert D. Tschirgi, M.D., PH.D., professor of Neurosciences, University of California, La Jolla, February 14, 1985

"The first surfacing of that part of my character that was later to show up in Daffy Duck occurred at the age of six. My sixth-birthday party, to be precise. I was immensely proud–it seems to me that all my life I have taken the most pride in things over which I have little or no control. Even though I had older sisters, it never occurred to me that anyone had ever become six years old before, and the splendid cake, candles bravely ablaze in salute to my maturity, was ample evidence that I had entered manhood.

"Having blown out the candles and, as a side benefit, managing to send most of the smoke up my little brother's nostrils, I was handed the knife, my first baton of any kind of authority in six misspent years, and was told to cut as large a piece as I liked. At this point Daffy Duck must have had, for me, his earliest beginnings, because I found to my surprise and pleasure that I had no desire to share my cake with anyone. I courteously returned the knife to my mother. I had no need for it, I explained; I would simplify the whole matter by taking the entire cake for myself. Not knowing she had an incipient duck on her hands, she laughed gently and tried to return the knife to my reluctant grasp. I again explained that the knife was superflous. It was impossible, I pointed out with incontrovertible logic, to cut a cake and still leave it entire for its rightful owner. I had no need and no desire to share.

"My father thereupon mounted the hustings (he was nine feet tall and looked like a moose without antlers) and escorted me to my room to contemplate in cakeless solitude the meaning of a word new to me: "selfish." To me then, and to Daffy Duck now, "selfish" means "honest but antisocial"; "unselfish" means "socially acceptable but often dishonest." We all want the whole cake, but, unlike Daffy and at least one six-year-old boy, the coward in the rest of us keeps the Daffy Duck, the small boy in us, under control." –Chuck Jones writing in his autobiography "Chuck Amuck" 1989

DDMI-01-001 copy
DDMI-01-003 copy
DDMI-01-010 copy
DDMI-01-012 copy
DDMI-01-077 copy
DDMI-01-084 copy
All drawings are by Chuck Jones, graphite on paper, circa 1950s through mid 1990s.

Get Creative! Invent the Future

Get creative invent the futurelogoflt

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is inspiring people to see, act and think creatively. Through programs, virtual communities, outreach and large interactive educational fun events, Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is changing the world for the better.

And you can be a big part of that change.

Sign up for $20 for 12 months and

Be entered to win one of 6 raffles in the coming year.

Raffle #1:
* Two 2012 Rose Bowl tickets (Jan. 2)

* Two Rose Parade tickets (Jan. 2)

* Towncar service for on Jan. 2nd (for the parade and the game) provided by Concierge Limousine Service

* Behind the scenes access of Rose Parade floats (Jan.1)
* Chuck Jones artwork

(all valued at more than $1500)

You will automatically be entered into 5 additional raffles throughout 2012 featuring fabulous gifts, events and experiences to be announced in the coming months. Get connected to the Jones family and to the growing number of people that know…creativity is saving the world!

Invite your friends to become a part of this great and growing community of creative and generous people inventing the future.