Tag Archives: characters

It Only Looks Easy

The wonderful folk at Tempe Center for the Arts have created a curricula for teachers and students centered around the Chuck Jones art exhibit they hosted in 2010. Titled "It Only Looks Easy" these plans are well-suited for elementary age children up to the high school level. Whether you're a teacher, student, artist, or anyone interested in learning about drawing animated characters and how artists learn to do what they do,these are definitely worth your time to explore, implement, and create! Click on "It Only Looks Easy" or the image below to check it out.

TCA pdf
While you're making plans for your next art class or learning experience, take a look at what the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity has going on at their new, improved website, ChuckJonesCenter.org.

Find Your “Paradise Season” This Saturday at the Chuck Jones Gallery, San Diego

Please join us in welcoming Disney matte painter and artist, James Coleman, this Saturday, April 7 from 5 to 8 PM at the Chuck Jones Gallery in San Diego's historic Gas Lamp District. This is Coleman's first gallery show in San Diego and we're thrilled to premier his first work starring Chuck Jones's Looney Tunes characters, "Paradise Season". Coleman, world renowned for his depiction of the Hawaiian Islands, has transported the characters made famous by Chuck Jones to an island idyll, complete with surfboards, leis, and Mai Tais.  It's enough to make you drop everything and get on a plane to join them! 

Paradise season copyright

To enjoy his work first hand, stop by the gallery Saturday, April 7th from 5 to 8 PM (or sooner) and meet this wonderful artist and get to know his work first-hand. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, at the gateway to the entertaining and lively Gas Lamp District. 

Crossing 5th avenue
The Chuck Jones Gallery art consultants head to work (from left: Micah Murray, Kate Bowerman, Dave Hausmann, Erin Liddell, Joel Shapiro, and gallery director, Mike Dicken.)

 

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like…The Chuck Jones Experience

Okay, it doesn't have the same lilting cadence, but Chuck Redux is here in Las Vegas where the temperature is frosty (no snowmen that we could see, but brrrr!), and we're ready to tell you that the Chuck Jones Experience is one amazing attraction.  Craig Kausen, Chuck's grandson, and I flew in yesterday to install the art exhibit at the Experience (more on that with photos tomorrow) and since this was the first time your author had seen it, I'm here to tell you that you won't believe how awesome it is. From the moment you walk in until the second you walk out — there is something fun to do, beautiful to see, and exciting to feel.  Fans of Chuck Jones, actually I'm going to include everyone who is a fan of animation and great cartoons, is going to find this experience, the Chuck Jones Experience, thrilling and that is not just me being hyperbolic.  Forthwith, some photos:

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When you first enter, you encounter Tareco Drive, the street that Chuck lived on in the Hollywood Hills for many years.  The name of the street was derived from Tarbell Realty Company (Ta-Re-Co) who had developed and sold much of the property.

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Tareco Drive will take you past the Chuck Jones Theater, where you'll…

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…stop to watch a cartoon and maybe a short film on the life of Chuck Jones or some other aspect of the world of animation, while you're there, you may even run into…

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…the awesome designer of the Experience, John Ramirez, a creative genius who knew Chuck Jones and has created some of the world's great theme park attractions, floats and other spectacles that entertain and amuse.  He's tops in our book!

Speaking of running into people (were we?)…while you're there, you never know who you might get to meet…

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…there's always the chance that Chuck's grandson and chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, Craig Kausen (seen standing left speaking with designer John Ramirez–seated–and Neil Cantor–whose committment to this project is without peer–and to the right, guests John and his son, Michael.) 

When you exit the Chuck Jones Theater, you might want to look down…

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…because you might just discover that you're standing on the manhole cover over the sewer where your 100,000 bad drawings drain away.  You do know that story, don't you?  About the 100,000 bad drawings?  Chuck had an art teacher at Chouinard Art Institute in the 1920s who told his class, "You birds have 100,000 bad drawings in you, start getting rid of them now!"

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 You'll not be surprised to run into your friends, Daffy W. Griffith and his cameraman, Bugs Bunny as they film….but, i've gotta run and get to work putting the finishing touches on the art installationsin Chuck's office, the "Measure Up" room and the museum, plus much, much more!

Explore Your Creativity from the Chuck Jones Side of Your Brain!

Bugs at drawing table cjcc

Explore the spirit of legendary animation director Chuck Jones this summer with three very special programs at the world-famous Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California!  Each seminar will meet on a Wednesday in August (3rd, 10th, 17th) from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM at the museum, 2002 N. Main Street (just south of the 5) in Santa Ana.  Tickets for all three seminars are $50.00 for members and $80.00 for non-members.  Individual sessions are $20.00 members and $30.00 non-members.  

The first seminar, "Embracing the Line, Facing the Lion", will be led by Marian Jones, a gifted photographer, artist, and writer.   As the late Chuck Jones' beloved wife and creative co-conspirator, Marian will share insights into Chuck's imagination–and help you explore and learn to trust your own unique creativity!

According to Chuck Jones, "failure as success" is just one of several great contradictions of creative endeavors. In this seminar, learn the "grammar" of drawing – learn to control the line, not the other way around! Session includes viewing of short cartoons and clips from Chuck Jones interviews, as well as a lively discussion of what "success" really means.

This session will include a presentation of several of Chuck Jones's cartoons plus a hands-on art project for participants.  

The second seminar, "Bringing Life to the Characters: Its the Oddities that Count!", presented by Linda Jones Clough, Chuck's daughter and sole focus of Chuck's fatherly affection.  She is an innovative and skilled entrepreneur and producer who has found success both on her own and working with her late father (look her up on IMDB and be dazzled.) 

Whether you draw, write, or tell stories, what allows you to bring what you imagine to life?  What makes cartoon characters so believable?  This seminar uses Chuck Jones films and sketches to demonstrate the astonishing things that can be done with seemingly lifeless, inanimate objects. Each participant in this seminar will draw, describe, or create an original character–and find genuine inspiration along the way.

For the third and final session, "The Pencil, the Computer, Children and Creativity" you'll join Craig Kausen, grandson of Chuck Jones, Chairman of the Board of Trustees (and a founding member) of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, as he shares his own personal perspective on the life of the imagination.

Whether we work with the oldest or the newest tools, the human touch is an absolutely essential component of creativity. This seminar highlights the Chuck Jones brand of character study:  how to harness the most subtle details of human and animal movement to bring your creations to life. Everyone participating in this highly interactive seminar will discuss which tools to use, and why, and will leave with tips on fostering children's (and adults') natural enthusiasm for creating art.   It will also include an art project for participants.  

But wait! To wrap up this series of imaginative and fun programs (in a bright shiny bow) will be a Chuck Jones Film Festival hosted by Craig Kausen on Sunday, July 28th, from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM.  Starring all of your favorite cartoon characters, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner, it will be a not-to-be-missed event at the Bowers!  

For more information, please email education@bowers.org , call 714.567.3677, or visit the Bowers website. 

 

 

Explore Your Creativity from the Chuck Jones Side of Your Brain!

Bugs at drawing table cjcc

Explore the spirit of legendary animation director Chuck Jones this summer with three very special programs at the world-famous Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California!  Each seminar will meet on a Wednesday in August (3rd, 10th, 17th) from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM at the museum, 2002 N. Main Street (just south of the 5) in Santa Ana.  Tickets for all three seminars are $50.00 for members and $80.00 for non-members.  Individual sessions are $20.00 members and $30.00 non-members.  

The first seminar, "Embracing the Line, Facing the Lion", will be led by Marian Jones, a gifted photographer, artist, and writer.   As the late Chuck Jones' beloved wife and creative co-conspirator, Marian will share insights into Chuck's imagination–and help you explore and learn to trust your own unique creativity!

According to Chuck Jones, "failure as success" is just one of several great contradictions of creative endeavors. In this seminar, learn the "grammar" of drawing – learn to control the line, not the other way around! Session includes viewing of short cartoons and clips from Chuck Jones interviews, as well as a lively discussion of what "success" really means.

This session will include a presentation of several of Chuck Jones's cartoons plus a hands-on art project for participants.  

The second seminar, "Bringing Life to the Characters: Its the Oddities that Count!", presented by Linda Jones Clough, Chuck's daughter and sole focus of Chuck's fatherly affection.  She is an innovative and skilled entrepreneur and producer who has found success both on her own and working with her late father (look her up on IMDB and be dazzled.) 

Whether you draw, write, or tell stories, what allows you to bring what you imagine to life?  What makes cartoon characters so believable?  This seminar uses Chuck Jones films and sketches to demonstrate the astonishing things that can be done with seemingly lifeless, inanimate objects. Each participant in this seminar will draw, describe, or create an original character–and find genuine inspiration along the way.

For the third and final session, "The Pencil, the Computer, Children and Creativity" you'll join Craig Kausen, grandson of Chuck Jones, Chairman of the Board of Trustees (and a founding member) of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, as he shares his own personal perspective on the life of the imagination.

Whether we work with the oldest or the newest tools, the human touch is an absolutely essential component of creativity. This seminar highlights the Chuck Jones brand of character study:  how to harness the most subtle details of human and animal movement to bring your creations to life. Everyone participating in this highly interactive seminar will discuss which tools to use, and why, and will leave with tips on fostering children's (and adults') natural enthusiasm for creating art.   It will also include an art project for participants.  

But wait! To wrap up this series of imaginative and fun programs (in a bright shiny bow) will be a Chuck Jones Film Festival hosted by Craig Kausen on Sunday, July 28th, from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM.  Starring all of your favorite cartoon characters, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner, it will be a not-to-be-missed event at the Bowers!  

For more information, please email education@bowers.org , call 714.567.3677, or visit the Bowers website. 

 

Image of the Day: Much Ado About Nutting

Another classic silent film (except for the music and sound effects, of course) from Chuck Jones and his amazing team of animators and artists, including Maurice Noble, Lloyd Vaughan, Ken Harris, Ben Washam and writer Michael Maltese.  Rolling into theaters nationwide on May 23, 1953, "Much Ado About Nutting" pits a little red squirrel against the nut of all nuts.

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Pre-production model sheet (gouache, watercolor and ink on 12 field animation paper) by Chuck Jones.

This cartoon pre-dates Jones's "One Froggy Evening" by two years, but thematically they share much in common: the desire we all have to succeed, the roadblocks we encounter on that path and how hopeful we reman in the face of the increasing difficulties placed in our way.

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Pre-production layout drawing (graphite on 12 field animation paper) by Chuck Jones.

You'll note with what care Jones takes to achieve the verisimilitude of a real squirrel in the above drawing, detailing not only how he chews, but also how he should blink and the timing involved in making this cartoon world come real.  

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Thumbnail background layouts (graphite and colored pencil) by Maurice Noble.

Maurice Noble's contributions to the films directed by Jones cannot be overstated.  Noble's unique ability to at once create an environment in which the actions of the characters may shine are delightfully balanced by their beauty, color and sense of humor.   They never overshadow or dominate, they always are moving the plot forward and yet they maintain their own integrity as works of art.   Watch and learn and laugh!

Success Tips from Chuck Jones (as reported in Business Management Daily)

Writing for Investment Business Daily and excerpted in Business Management Daily, writer Curt Schleier distills some of the points that Chuck Jones makes about his successful career:

"Even as a little kid, cartoon creator and producer Chuck Jones grabbed opportunities.

Jones credits his career to his father’s string of business failures. Every time the old man launched a business, he’d print nice stationery and buy promotional pencils. Using those cast-off tools, Jones drew and drew.

Eventually, he went on to create Daffy Duck, Road Runner, Pepe Le Pew and Wile E. Coyote. He also breathed new life into Bugs Bunny.

Some secrets to his success:

He perceived each character individually. It started with the family cat, Johnson, whose favorite food was grapefruit and who enjoyed swimming in the Pacific Ocean.

Johnson was “different than other cats. … That laid the groundwork, so when I got to doing Daffy Duck or Bugs Bunny or Coyote, [I understood] that’s it’s not all coyotes, that it’s the particular coyote. Wile E. Coyote, genius. That’s what he calls himself. He’s different.”

To read the entire article in Business Management Daily, click on this sentence!  

  Chuck Jones by Wile E Coyote sm

Lawrence Noble: Wile E. Coyote & Road Runner Bronze Sculptures

In late 2006, National Sculpture Society member, Lawrence Noble, was commissioned to create bronze sculptures of Chuck Jones' iconic cartoon creations, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner.  Working closely from Jones' original model drawings and along with input from Jones' daughter, Linda, Noble drafted several concepts of the characters in his classical illustrative style. 

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Once his drawings were approved by Linda Jones, Noble sculpted a maquette of each of the characters in clay.  This months long process culminated in an exquisite pair of bronze sculptures, cast in the time-honored lost wax casting process, that have been produced in a small edition limited to only 100 examples world-wide. 

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“Art helps us find some of the mysteries [of life] and not necessarily solve them, but at least identify that they are there in our lives. Art is one of those languages that allow us to realize the depth and resonance of our existence.”

For over 30 years, sculptor Lawrence Noble has been answering the call of these mysteries through his sculpture. He considers himself an American sculptor, in the mode of the Romantic sculptors of the late 19th century, Augustus Saint Gaudens and Daniel Chester French.

His early artistic career included designing and illustrating motion picture advertising campaigns including "Time After Time"; "Flash Gordon"; "Sharky's Machine"; "The Empire Strikes Back" (10th Anniversary Poster) and more recently, he has produced sculptures for "Searching for Bobby Fischer" and "The Rock". Noble designed an Olympic Gold Medal for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and he sculpted the "Daytona 500" trophy.

Noble’s first bronze sculpture, a life size equestrian monument to Civil War General, Philip H. Sheridan was unveiled in Chicago in June of 1990. He also sculpted the 7' bronze statue of Jack Benny which is located at the Epicenter, home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes Minor League Baseball Team. Noble produced the "Car of the Year" award for Playboy Magazine from 1990 – 1995 and is a regular contributor to the magazine, including the Millennium Issue (January, 2000).

Noble gradually moved into what he calls the applied art of sculpture, doing mostly large-scale public pieces. "I realized shortly after I started sculpting that I was tapping into the things I was most interested in as a child," he explains. "It had later manifested into graphic art and illustration, but the primal root of it seemed to be that I had a fascination with building three-dimensional objects."

Noble was selected by the California Fire Foundation to produce a bronze monument titled Holding the Line. This memorial to California firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty is located in historic Capitol Park in Sacramento, California. Noble Studio was also commissioned to design and sculpt the San Bernardino County Peace Officers' Memorial, a ten foot tall bronze monument to Peace Officers killed in the line of duty.

The 59 year old artist/sculptor, born in Tampa, Florida, raised and educated in Houston, Texas, has resided in a mountain community in southern California for the last seventeen years with his wife, Elizabeth and their children Casey Josephine and John Marlay. Linda Jones Enterprises is pleased to publish and represent the sculpture, drawings and graphic editions of Lawrence Noble.