Tag Archives: centennial celebration

Chuck Jones Centennial Film Tribute at Cinefamily

This past weekend, Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre in West Hollywood, California hosted a two-day film tribute to Chuck Jones. Hosted by animation film historian and author, Jerry Beck, on Saturday, they screened eight of Chuck's masterpieces from his days at Warner Bros. including such classics as "What's Opera, Doc?" and "One Froggy Evening" both of which are in the Library of Congress's National Film Registry. The late afternoon event wrapped with a rare screening of Chuck Jones's 1973 TV special, "A Cricket in Times Square." The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity provided Cinefamily with Chuck's personal 35mm prints of the cartoons. 

Jerry Beck (L) and Alexander McDonald, program director for Cinefamily, outside the Silent Movie Theatre.

Jerry's special guest on Saturday was animator, art director, and theme park designer, John Ramirez, who had worked with Chuck Jones in the 1980s and 1990s. He and his colleagues were the designers of the Chuck Jones exhibition at the Capitol Children's Museum, Washington, D.C. in 1990. 

Jerry Beck (L) and John Ramirez discuss the finer points of a Chuck Jones cartoon at the Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre in West Hollywood.

There was even cake! (Who doesn't like a good carrot cake, I ask you?)


On Sunday, Craig Kausen, chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and Chuck's grandson, made opening remarks before a screening of Jones's only feature film, "The Phantom Tollbooth." Special guest, actor Butch Patrick, who starred as Milo in "The Phantom Tollbooth" made an appearance and spoke with the near-capacity crowd. All-in-all it was a great weekend for Chuck Jones fans!

Animator and fan, Thom Nicolette (L) with actor Butch Patrick ("The Munsters", "The Phantom Tollbooth") at the Cinefamily Chuck Jones Film Tribute. 

Craig Kausen (L) and Butch Patrick at the Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre in West Hollywood.

Craig Kausen (R) brought a portfolio of material from the making of "The Phantom Tollbooth" to share with the crowd of fans. He's seen here with Alexander McDonald (far left) of Cinefamily and Jerry Beck (center), author, animation historian and host/moderator for the weekend film tribute to Chuck Jones.

Photographer Stephen Russo (R) seen with Butch Patrick outside the Silent Movie Theatre. Mr. Russo provided all of the photos for this post. Thank you, Stephen!

Chuck Jones Retrospective Exhibition to Open at Cartoon Art Museum–San Francisco

Chuck Jones: Drawing on Imagination
100 Years of an Animated Artist
Cartoon Art Museum
  February 9 – May 5, 2013

San Francisco:  The Cartoon Art Museum has announced a centennial
retrospective of the art of legendary animation director and creator Chuck Jones, on display from February 9
through May 5, 2013.  The exhibition, comprising 100 works of art from the
late 1930s through the late 1990s, is entitled Chuck Jones: Drawing on
100 Years of an Animated Artist. Artwork for the exhibit is
provided by the Chuck
Jones Center for Creativity
Costa Mesa, CA.

FAFU-01-005 72 dpi copy
Original model sheet for the Chuck Jones-directed "Fast and Furry-ous" 1949. This cartoon marked the debut of Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner. 

Chuck Jones, a graduate of the Chouinard Art Institute (now CalArts in
Valencia), drew $1.00 portraits on Olvera Street in downtown Los Angeles before
he began his career in animation as a cel washer at Ubbe Iwerks Studio in 1932.
He directed his first cartoon, “The Night Watchman,” for Leon Schlesinger
Productions in 1938 and went to helm such classic Warner Brothers shorts as
"What's Opera, Doc?" and "One Froggy Evening."  Winner
of three animation Oscars and an honorary Lifetime Achievement Oscar for
"the creation of classic cartoons and cartoon characters," Jones is
today considered synonymous with the "Golden Age" of studio animation
and has inspired many of today’s most significant film directors,
artists, and animators.  

“I have been a fan of the Cartoon Art Museum
for many years and to finally have such an extensive exhibition presented here
is like a dream come true.  My grandfather loved San Francisco and its
denizens. This exhibition, with many never-before-exhibited works, is a
masterpiece to celebrate Chuck’s Centennial Celebration,” said Craig Kausen,
Chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity and Chuck’s grandson.

“We’re thrilled with the opportunity to partner with the Chuck Jones Center for
Creativity, and to bring our patrons 100 pieces of classic and rarely seen
artwork from one of the greatest and most influential cartoonists in American
history,” said Cartoon Art Museum curator Andrew Farago.  “Chuck received
the Cartoon Art Museum’s Sparky Award for lifetime achievement in 1998, and I’m
grateful for the opportunity to further celebrate his extraordinary career and

About The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a non-profit 501(c)3 charity located in
Costa Mesa, California. Founded in 1999 by four-time Academy Award recipient
and legendary animation creator, Chuck Jones, the Center’s vision is to inspire
the innate creative genius within each person that leads to a more joyous,
passionate, and harmonious life and world.

The Center is dedicated to re-invigorating the creative spirit and they are
doing it through art classes, exhibitions, lectures, and film festivals, all of
which spring from the material in the Chuck Jones archive. Jones was a
determined saver and his writings, art, and other ephemera from a nine-decade
life along with his philosophy of guiding and nurturing instruction form the
basis of their programs.

About the Cartoon Art Museum

Founded in 1984, the Cartoon
Art Museum
the only museum in the western United States dedicated to cartoons and comics.
 The museum was started by a group of cartoonists and collectors who
wanted to share their appreciation of this unique art form with the rest of the
world.  The museum is dedicated to the collection, preservation, study and
exhibition of original cartoon art in all forms to benefit historians,
cartoonists, journalists, artists, collectors and the general public.