Tag Archives: cartoonist

A Twisted Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Waste!

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity Presents a Creative Classroom Led by Leigh Rubin, Author & Illustrator of the Syndicated Comic Strip, Rubes®

Sunday, November 15 from 2 to 4 PM

A Musical Performance by Andrew Rubin Will Close the Workshop

Costa Mesa, Ca: Need more humor in your life? The world is a serious place and let’s face it, we all need to lighten up. There really is humor in almost any situation, but how do we find it? All it takes is a bit of mental twist to look at your world in a funny way. Discover the humor in your own life by mentally stepping out of your normal routine and into your very own twistedly absurd and funny world! This illustrated lecture and workshop is a comic adventure inside the ridiculously twisted mind of Leigh Rubin, Rubes® cartoonist and “sit down” comic. This afternoon presentation is free and open to the public and is recommended for ages 10 and above. At the end of the lecture, Leigh’s talented musician son, Andrew, will perform for approximately one-half hour.

Leigh Rubin began his cartooning career in 1978 by establishing his own greeting card company, Rubes® Publications. His first cartoon collection, the popular Notable Quotes musical cartoons was published in 1981. Originally self-syndicated, 2014 marked the 30th anniversary of his daily cartoon, Rubes®, which is now distributed by Creators Syndicate to more than 400 newspapers and media outlets worldwide. Rubes® appears in major daily metropolitan newspapers, such as the Los Angeles Daily News, the Vancouver Sun, the Oregonian, the Staten Island Advance, the Washington Times, the Sacramento Bee, the Houston Chronicle, and the Orange County Register. Rubin recently launched a new website, WhyGrowUp.Club, celebrating life’s simple pleasures.

Leigh and Cow Photo

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity’s Creative Classroom began with a workshop led by children’s author and illustrator, Kelly Light, in February 2015 and is a quarterly free-to-the-public workshop presented by the Center. Award-winning actor and illustrator, Richard Kinsey delighted the summer crowd with his innovative take on storytelling. The Center is pleased to present “A Twisted Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Waste”, led by the funny and charming, Leigh Rubin, as part of this ongoing series.


Andrew Rubin, of California’s Central Coast, has been cultivating his passion for music since he was thirteen years old. He is best known as the lead guitarist of the rock trio, The Spaces Between, and has a background of various musical projects involving Pop, Jazz, Funk, and more. In more recent times, Andrew discovered a new-found love for classical music and, with support from peers and mentors, has taken up composition. Now 20, he is currently working on his third classical piece, and aims to continue with great vigor the writing and performance that brings him so much joy, as well as further exploration and progress in all branches of his musical career. The Center is pleased to present Andrew Rubin in a short concert appearance after his father’s workshop.

andrew rubin

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is located at 3321 Hyland Avenue, Suite A, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Part of the exciting South Coast Collection (SoCo), the Center’s vision is a world where creativity is known, in all disciplines, by the many, not just the few. The Center offers art classes and programs, both on site and with our community partners around Orange County. Visit ChuckJonesCenter.org to learn more. The Leigh Rubin Creative Classroom is on Sunday, November 15, 2015 from 2 to 4 PM. It is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. Please contact Programs@ChuckJonesCenter.org or call 949-660-7793 x 107 to reserve your seat.

Cartoonist Lynda Barry to Teach University-Level Course on Doodling and Neuroscience

From the January 26 issue of the website "Open Culture" comes this report about cartoonist Lynda Barry and her new course on doodling and neuroscience:

Cartoonist Lynda Barry, who has helped legions of adults grope their way back to the unselfconscious creativity of childhood, is teaching at the university level. Barry’s Unthinkable Mind course is designed to appeal to students of the humanities.  Also hardcore science majors, the sort of lab-coated specimens the first group might refer to as “brains.” The instructor describes her University of Wisconsin spring semester offering thus:

A writing and picture-making class with focus on the basic physical structure of the brain with emphasis on hemispheric differences and a particular sort of insight and creative concentration that seems to come about when we are using our hands (the original digital devices) —to help us figure out a problem.

The twenty-one grads and undergrads accepted into Professor Barry’s course have been warned, via the illustrated letter above,  handwritten on legal paper, that the workload will be heavy.


You should be warned as well, if you elect to audit this course from home. Enrollment is not necessary. Professor Barry will be posting her weekly assignments and curriculum materials on her tumblr, a forum where her abiding interest in science is as apparent as her devotion to undirected doodling. Your first assignment, posted above, requires a box of crayons, the coloring pages of your choice, downloaded to four types of paper, and a significant chunk of time set aside for brain-related articles and vintage videos starring Cognitive Neuroscientist Michael Gazzaniga and astronomer Carl Sagan. You should also be committed to keeping a four-minute diary and serving as your own guinea pig.

Who’s in?

A big H/T @kirstinbutler



“Cartoon Therapy” at the Chuck Jones Gallery–Santa Fe

Staci Matlock of the Santa Fe New Mexican wrote about the Saturday morning Chuck Jones Film Festival held this past Saturday at the Chuck Jones Gallery on Palace Avenue in Old Santa Fe.  

You can read how the term "cartoon therapy" came to be by clicking on this sentence.

Ricardo cate
 Ricardo Cate, author of the comic strip Without Reservations, talks Saturday at the Chuck Jones Gallery holiday cartoon festival about coming up with ideas and characters on a daily basis and lets the audience throw out ideas for new drawings. –  Photo by Natalie Guillen/The New Mexican

This inspired me today…


Original production cel from the 1966 Chuck Jones produced and directed Oscar-winning short animated film, "The Dot and the Line," India ink on rice paper with an gouache on acetate overlay.  

"Lines are the grammar of all art.  Even in animation, all characters are born of graceful, linear drawing.  The most important discovery I made at Chouinard, one that has been shared by every artist, cartoonist, painter in history…was the ability to live by the single line–that single, honest delineation of the artist's intent."  –Chuck Jones