Tag Archives: books

From Crickets to Coyotes and Everything In-between! Red Dot Auction Update!

So much awesomeness! Artists, where do you get all of your ideas? The theme this year, as it has been in the past, was “The Life and Times of Chuck Jones”. Chuck was born in 1912 and passed away in 2002; his nine decade life spanned most of the 20th century as well as the history of the animated film. He was interested in, no, let me put that another way, he was fascinated by everything in the world around him. A voracious reader, Chuck Jones cited influences as diverse as Mark Twain and Carlos Santayana; and from the actor and director Charlie Chaplin to the grapefruit-loving Johnson the Cat.  Nothing was too small not to catch his attention.

That gave our artists for this year’s Red Dot Auction a lot to consider and to be inspired by as witnessed in the works below.

What’s that you say? You haven’t bought your tickets for the Red Dot Auction on Friday, May 1 from 7 to 10 PM? What are you waiting for? They’re just $25 per person online (click here) or $35 per at the door. Be there or be square (just like the canvases!)

Mel Blanc, pyrography (wood burning) on wood, 12" square.

Mel Blanc, pyrography (wood burning) on wood, 12″ square.

Claude and Frisky Puppy, colored pencil on canvas,

Claude and Frisky Puppy, colored pencil on canvas, 12″ square.

"Roughing It" acrylic on canvas, 12" square.

“Roughing It” acrylic on canvas, 12″ square.

Cricket and Kandinsky, digital art on paper, 12" square.

Cricket and Kandinsky, digital art on paper, 12″ square.

 

The White Seal

In 1974, Chuck Jones brought to life the story of Kotick, the white seal, while a vice-president in charge of children’s programming at ABC.  This television special was based on the story of survival and perseverance of a group of seals living in the Bering Straits.  The original tale is by Rudyard Kipling and can be found in his collection* of stories, “The Jungle Book”.   Chuck Jones also recreated for television two other Kipling tales, “Rikki Tikki Tavi” 1975 and “Mowgli’s Brothers” 1976.  This image below is a recreation by lithography of an original production cel and background used in the film and later featured on the cover of the book based on the television special “The White Seal”. 

LITHO-142 copy

*From “Chuck Amuck” by Chuck Jones:  “We always had books in the house we lived in.  We not only had books, we had books (old or new) that were fresh to us.  The way it worked was this: a house in those days of the early twenties had books.  Incredible as it seems, that’s what people did: they read.  We didn’t have a phonograph until I was twelve, a radio until I was seventeen, or television until I was forty-six.

“So that left books.  When you rented a furnished house, it was equipped with furniture and books.  …Father would scout around for a furnished house.  “Furnished” in his lexicon meant furnished with books, hundreds being mandatory, thousands being preferable.  Colonel Terhune’s big house on the Speedway in Ocean Park had thousands of books, as did Times editor Harry Carr’s place on Mount Washington Drive, so the six or seven or eight of our family stayed in each house for over five years, until we had exhausted the supply,  a sort of omnivorous plague of indiscriminate readers.” 

 

Quote of the Day: An Enormous Quantity of Books

"Fortunately for me I had a father who devoured an enormous quantity of books.  So I read everything that fell into my hands:  Aesop, Balzac, La Fontaine, Peter Rabbit, Mark Twain, Dickens, the dictionary, O. Henry, anything.  But even authors like Jean-Paul Sartre inspire me in a sort of reverse action with lots of ideas.  "No Exit" (that will surprise you) is for me a mine of gags, since it symbolizes the frustration of the human condition.  And as for James Joyce, whom I cannot read without a Gaelic dictionary–and a Greek dictionary, a Bible, a book of liturgical vestments and an almanac–well, anyone who has a Gaelic dictionary knows it is one of the humourous masterpieces of the world.  So the peripheral advantages of research are manifest.

LITHO-136.4x6.300 copy
"The Persistence of Carrots" fine art limited edition hand-pulled lithograph by Chuck Jones.

Happy Thanksgiving, constant readers, we appreciate you!

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity Expresses Gratitude

Oscar sign tca

Tempe Center for the Arts: "Chuck Amuck: A Legacy of Laughter" exhibit

Late in his life, Chuck Jones began to receive long
overdue accolades for his prolific body of work.  These included a film
retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of the Moving
Image, London (for which he created, on-site, a multi-story mural of his
much-loved Warner Bros. characters,) and an interactive art exhibition at the
Capitol Children’s Museum, Washington, D.C.   And of course, there have been
multiple film festival tributes world-wide honoring the man who brought you such
classic animated fare as “What’s Opera, Doc?” and “The Dot and the Line.” 

But, for the first time, his art (drawings, paintings,
writings) and his life (photos and ephemera) along with his film work have been
the focus of an exciting triple-site retrospective, lovingly constructed and
executed by the amazing curatorial staffs of the Tempe Center for the Arts
(Chuck Amuck:  A Legacy of
Laughter)
, Tempe Public Libraries (The Books of Chuck Jones:  Black and White and Read
All Over),
and Sky Harbor Airport Museum, Phoenix (Chuck Jones:  An Animated Life).  Their
obvious love for Jones’ work, along with their creative energy and
professionalism, has made these exhibitions a must-see event for Chuck Jones
fans around the globe.

IMG_1801 

Sky Harbor Airport Museum: "Chuck Jones: An Animated Life" exhibit

The Board of Trustees of Chuck Jones Center for
Creativity would like to particularly thank,

Michelle Dock: Gallery Coordinator of Tempe Center for the Arts;

Lennée Eller: Museum Program Manager of Sky Harbor Airport

These two made these three exhibits exciting, exuberant and exceptional.  Thank you.

IMG_1849
Tempe Public Library, "The Books of Chuck Jones:  Black and White and Read All Over" exhibit

The Center for Creativity would like to thank the
Tempe Center for the Arts, Tempe Cultural Services/Community
Services, Tempe Public Library, and Tempe Parks and Recreations for their assistance
in bringing Chuck Amuck, A Legacy of
Laughter
to the valley of the sun.  Of course, there were so many
people involved at all three locations: art handlers, registrars, graphic
designers, and docents; each and everyone an important facet of the final
product.   Here is a list of those who worked so hard to make these exhibitions
so beautiful and so successful.

Adrienne Richwine, Cultural Services Deputy
Manager

Don Fassinger, Facility Manager, TCA

Mary Fowler, PR/Management Assistant

Kathleen Dooner, Production Coordinator

Sally Garrsion, Front of House Coordinator

Kara Osburn, Box Office Manager

Marilyn Gliddon, Facility Maintenance

Cameo Wall, Administrative Assistant

Suzanne Durkin-Bighorn, Business Development
Coordinator

Gail Fisher, Mel Kessler, Diane
Cripe: Friends of TCA

Sherry Warren, Tempe Public
Library

Clay Workman, Tempe Public
Library

Marco Albarran, Gallery

Laura Hukill, Gallery

James Sulak, Gallery

Carrie Meyer, Gallery

Donna Smith, Gallery

Jennifer Campbell, Gallery

Chris Vialpando, Gallery

Sam Carrera, Gallery

Karen Drazek, Intern, Gallery

Christy Brown, Gallery

David Uhley, ASU volunteer

Mary Erickson, ASU/Curriculum Consultant

Kathy David, Tempe High School/Curriculum
Consultant

TCA Docent Volunteers

TCA Front of House staff and
volunteers

TCA Production Crew

And, yes–all three exhibitions are
still open to the public!

Our Heartfelt Gratitude

Oscar sign tca

Tempe Center for the Arts: "Chuck Amuck: A Legacy of Laughter" exhibit

Late in his life, Chuck Jones began to receive long
overdue accolades for his prolific body of work.  These included a film
retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of the Moving
Image, London (for which he created, on-site, a multi-story mural of his
much-loved Warner Bros. characters,) and an interactive art exhibition at the
Capitol Children’s Museum, Washington, D.C.   And of course, there have been
multiple film festival tributes world-wide honoring the man who brought you such
classic animated fare as “What’s Opera, Doc?” and “The Dot and the Line.” 

But, for the first time, his art (drawings, paintings,
writings) and his life (photos and ephemera) along with his film work have been
the focus of an exciting triple-site retrospective, lovingly constructed and
executed by the amazing curatorial staffs of the Tempe Center for the Arts
(Chuck Amuck:  A Legacy of
Laughter)
, Tempe Public Libraries (The Books of Chuck Jones:  Black and White and Read
All Over),
and Sky Harbor Airport Museum, Phoenix (Chuck Jones:  An Animated Life).  Their
obvious love for Jones’ work, along with their creative energy and
professionalism, has made these exhibitions a must-see event for Chuck Jones
fans around the globe.

IMG_1801 

Sky Harbor Airport Museum: "Chuck Jones: An Animated Life" exhibit

The Board of Trustees of Chuck Jones Center for
Creativity would like to particularly thank,

Michelle Dock: Gallery Coordinator of Tempe Center for the Arts;

Lennée Eller: Museum Program Manager of Sky Harbor Airport

These two made these three exhibits exciting, exuberant and exceptional.  Thank you.

IMG_1849
Tempe Public Library, "The Books of Chuck Jones:  Black and White and Read All Over" exhibit

The Center for Creativity would like to thank the
Tempe Center for the Arts, Tempe Cultural Services/Community
Services, Tempe Public Library, and Tempe Parks and Recreations for their assistance
in bringing Chuck Amuck, A Legacy of
Laughter
to the valley of the sun.  Of course, there were so many
people involved at all three locations: art handlers, registrars, graphic
designers, and docents; each and everyone an important facet of the final
product.   Here is a list of those who worked so hard to make these exhibitions
so beautiful and so successful.

Adrienne Richwine, Cultural Services Deputy
Manager

Don Fassinger, Facility Manager, TCA

Mary Fowler, PR/Management Assistant

Kathleen Dooner, Production Coordinator

Sally Garrsion, Front of House Coordinator

Kara Osburn, Box Office Manager

Marilyn Gliddon, Facility Maintenance

Cameo Wall, Administrative Assistant

Suzanne Durkin-Bighorn, Business Development
Coordinator

Gail Fisher, Mel Kessler, Diane
Cripe: Friends of TCA

Sherry Warren, Tempe Public
Library

Clay Workman, Tempe Public
Library

Marco Albarran, Gallery

Laura Hukill, Gallery

James Sulak, Gallery

Carrie Meyer, Gallery

Donna Smith, Gallery

Jennifer Campbell, Gallery

Chris Vialpando, Gallery

Sam Carrera, Gallery

Karen Drazek, Intern, Gallery

Christy Brown, Gallery

David Uhley, ASU volunteer

Mary Erickson, ASU/Curriculum Consultant

Kathy David, Tempe High School/Curriculum
Consultant

TCA Docent Volunteers

TCA Front of House staff and
volunteers

TCA Production Crew

And, yes–all three exhibitions are
still open to the public!