Tag Archives: 1950s

The Linda Jones Clough Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 3

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. We had a beautiful, big yellow tom cat named Passmore (yes, named after the street we lived on). One day I asked my parents, “If Passmore had kittens, could we have one?”  Of course, their answer was that Passmore was a tom cat and therefore could not have kittens. I said, “But IF he had kittens, could we have one?” With a knowing glance at each other, they agreed. I took them across the street to our neighbor’s black cat who had just had five adorable little yellow kittens…Yes, I got not only one, but two…I named them Rudy and Bennie…Here is Part III.

CJCC - Part III Illustration from Canyon Crier

[PART III] House with Long Haul 

I decided to employ logic. Even if I lost with Dottie, I might impress Linda. I indicated with patient yet pointed logic that the two miles to the nearest lady-ridge-resider ride-sharing intersection was Woodrow Wilson and Mulholland, while the nearest market was but a scant half mile from our home on Passmore Drive…and all down hill, including one hundred and eighty-seven steps connecting our street with steps connecting our street with the one below. Furthermore it would take a full day’s supply of gas in our gasping Oldsmobile to struggle up Woodrow Wilson to Mulholland and share in the economies of the ridge girls in their gay junkets to Finkle’s market at Highland and Franklin.

She had gained confidence through my maunderings and gently exhaling a fragrant cloud of rum, maple and tobacco, said that down-hill empty-handed became up-hill grocery laden, that the one hundred and eighty steps was a farce going down with gravity as a friend, but became an endless cement ladder going up, laden with salmon, Spam, short-ribs, and such. Furthermore the steps were dangerous; behind a fence paralleling the last fifty feet lived a psychotic Doberman Pinscher, a reject from the Canine Corps—who in being taught to bite enemy soldiers had carried instructions a step further and now bit anything. He had gnawed a head-sized hole out of his chain link fence, and travelers on the steps could only avoid the action of his garbage-disposal jaws by wading through a breast-high orchard of greasy poison oak opposite him. When Linda was with her, she had to carry her—and the groceries—over her (Dottie’s) head. All this she was willing to endure, she said, but in her illogical woman’s way she just couldn’t see what having poison oak, hydrophobia, and a weakened hearts was doing to further the war effort.

[Come back next week for part IV!]

A Message from Master American Portrait Artist, Fran Lew

FBmarilyn

Marilyn Monroe is considered by many film scholars as the most famous female movie star of all time. Monroe, famous for playing ‘dumb blonde’ characters became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s. No other Hollywood star has ever inspired such a wide range of emotions – from lust to pity, from envy to remorse. Her legacy lives on today as she continues to be a major pop culture icon. Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials, I give you her timeless soft tantalizing seductive persona in this Chuck Jones Gallery limited edition entitled ‘Marilyn’. The Chuck Jones Gallery has paid great attention to the nuances and details in my drawing. I have hand signed each print in this edition. Contact your Chuck Jones Gallery representative. This small edition won’t last very long.

Edition of 85, hand-signed by the artist, just $225 unframed. An excellent holiday gift!

Image of the Day: Life Drawings — Men

GICLEE-22 copy

As mentioned in previous posts, throughout his life, Chuck Jones studied the human form, either independently or in formal life drawing classes.  The image of the man (above) is a mixed media (charcoal and chalk on paper) from a life drawing class Jones participated in the 1950s.  The oil painting below is also from the 1950s and exhibits all of the hallmarks of Jones' signature style and graphic genius. 

Man-low res copy

Image of the Day: Bugs Bunny

Two of my co-workers and I spent part of the morning pulling artwork for the upcoming Chuck Jones exhibit at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences that opens May 14th.  Although we all work with Chuck Jones art everyday, we're oftentimes removed from it (via computer screens, etc.) and today to have had the opportunity to get close to so much visual richness, ingenuity and creativity was completely inspiring!

This drawing of Bugs Bunny by Chuck Jones (graphite and colored pencil on 12 field animation paper) was a preliminary layout for a life-size (6') cut-out sign that was posted at the gate to the Warner Bros. lot in the 1950s.  

BBMI-01-008 copy