Category Archives: The Art of Chuck Jones

Chuck Jones’s Grandson to Speak at Colorado Springs Fine Art Center Exhibition

On Saturday, December 3rd at noon, Craig Kausen, the grandson of animator and Oscar-winning director Chuck Jones, will give a special presentation in the Music Room of the Colorado Springs Fine Art Center where he will discuss his grandfather’s work.

This original production cel from "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" and many others are on display at the Colorado Springs Fine Art Center through January 8, 2017.

This original production cel from “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” and many others are on display at the Colorado Springs Fine Art Center through January 8, 2017.

During the “Golden Age” of animation, Chuck Jones helped bring to life many of Warner Bros.’ most famous characters and created characters such as Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Marvin Martian, Pepe le Pew, and many others. Jones also directed the 1966 television special, How the Grinch Stole Christmas. After the talk, join collector Bill Heeter in the galleries to learn more about his private collection of original animation cels and ephemera. Please RSVP for this event, as there is limited seating, by emailing boxoffice@csfineartscenter.org or calling 719.477.4310. For more information about the exhibit and the Colorado Springs Fine Art Center, click here.

Chuck Jones Gallery–San Diego–One of the Top Fun Things to Do in San Diego

Top Fun Things to Do in San Diego has listed the Chuck Jones Gallery one of their “Top Fun Things to Do in San Diego”! When you’re visiting San Diego, make sure to drop by our gallery and say hello–our knowledgeable staff will answer your questions and speak with you about the art of American Pop culture, including the work of legendary animation pioneer, Chuck Jones. Don’t forget to check out Top Fun Things to Do in San Diego for other cool and nifty things to do when you’re in town.

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DAFFY DUCK PAC RAISING FUNDS FOR PRESIDENTIAL RUN

DAFFY DUCK PAC RAISING FUNDS FOR PRESIDENTIAL RUN

Contributions support the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Orange County, CA, February 25, 2016: Renowned film legend Daffy Duck announced his intent to seek the office of President of the United States. Shouting at a crowd of three from the steps of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, candidate Duck hinted at his platform. “A vote for Daffy Duck is a vote for creativity and imagination, and I’m throwing my bill into the ring! Why not? It’s been thrown everywhere else!”

Tying the announcement in with an early victory party on June 5, 2016, before the California Primary (Tuesday, June 7, 2016), the Chuck Jones Center in Orange County will host a “Daffy Duck for President” bumper sticker/campaign poster drawing party, with prizes and celebrations.  Supporters can cast their vote for Daffy at any time on the Center’s website, http://www.daffyforpresident.org.  “I’m the only candidate for the party, and if anybody knows about a party, it’s this duck!” he told the largely silent trio of passersby.

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Mr. Duck’s reasons for entering the grueling 2016 political fray were clarified in a press release. “As candidates of both parties fall away, one candidate rises! A champion of the people who’s not mainstream (but who knows his streams). He’s more stream-of-consciousness. He believes in mom, apple pie, and social insecurity. He’s got brains, bluster, and pluck! He’s a nihilistic socialist rogue insider with Tea Party Appeal.”

For every contribution of $100 to the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity’s “Daffy for President” PAC (Patently Angry Character), the contributor will receive a hardcover copy of Chuck Jones’s “Daffy Duck for President,” a “Daffy for President” campaign button, and a “Daffy for President 2016” bumper sticker. For contributions less than $100, a variety of other gifts are included. Visit http://www.daffyforpresident.org to donate today and for full details! All contributions benefit the educational and outreach programs of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, a 501(c)3 public charity located in Orange County, California. The Center brings creativity programs to underserved children and adults in Los Angeles, Orange Counties, and beyond.

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“Daffy puts the ‘wag’ back in ‘bandwagon,’” the announcement said. “He puts the ‘otus’ back in POTUS. He puts the ‘ivity’ back in ‘creativity.’ He’s not only a problem solver, but he’s a problem creator! And if this world needs anything these days, it’s more problems! Ladies and Gentlemen—we ask your support for the next leader of the Free (if not reasonably priced) World–Daffy Duck for President, 2016!”

Chuck Jones’s “Daffy Duck for President” was a pet project of the four-time Academy Award-recipient and legendary animation pioneer, and was born of a desire to talk to kids about the process of passing a law as detailed in the U.S. Constitution. Using Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Jones’s unique brand of humor, the book was his last published work.

Endorsements have poured in:

“Eh, what’s one more lunatic?” – Bugs Bunny, international film star

“Petty. Greedy. Jealous. And transparent! Daffy fits the bill.” –Foghorn Leghorn (R-Alabama)

“Who?” – Porky Pig, actor

“Are you serious? Start-a-runnin’, varmint!” – Yosemite Sam, diplomat. 

About Daffy Duck:

Daffy Duck is an animated cartoon character created by the animation studio of Warner Bros. in the 1930s. Styled as an anthropomorphic black duck, the character has appeared in cartoon series such as Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies where he has usually been depicted as the screwball companion and occasional archrival of Bugs Bunny. Daffy starred in 133 shorts in animation’s Golden Age, making him the third most frequent character in the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons, behind Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig.

Daffy was number 14 on TV Guide‘s list of top 50 best cartoon characters and was featured on one of the issue’s four covers as Duck Dodgers with Porky Pig.

About the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity:

The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a 501(c)3 public charity located in Orange County, CA. Chuck Jones was a creative genius  who gave life to Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote & Bugs Bunny along with over 300 animated films.  The Center, which he founded in 1999, is an organization that fosters and teaches creative thinking—the thinking behind problem solving. It’s a proven fact that “creativity” is like a muscle in your brain that needs exercise in order to get and stay healthy. The stronger that muscle is, the better it works in engaging tasks and solving problems. The Center serves as a gymnasium for the brain. We work with disadvantaged youth, school systems without arts programs, people on the autism spectrum, the elderly (many of whom suffer from early onset dementia), and other groups, including corporate clients, who see the value of pumping up creativity in their ranks.

Support the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. Exercise Your Genius!

Images are available upon request. Interviews available and are dependent upon the candidate’s prior engagements.

 

Calling All Artists! Red Dot Auction VI!

Dear Artists and Friends of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity,

Preparations are underway for the Sixth Annual Red Dot Auction benefiting the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, scheduled for Thursday, May 12 and Friday, May 13, 2016.

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Today we’re writing to ask you to donate a work of art to this year’s Sixth Annual Red Dot Auction. The canvas provided is 12” square and as last year, we ask that you sign the artwork on the reverse.  You may prefer to work on paper or another substrate and that’s fine as long as we can mount it to the 12” square canvas for presentation the night of the event. The artwork should be signed on the reverse so that bidders at this silent auction will not know who has created which painting.

“What should I paint?” Chuck’s life spanned most of the 20th century and with such a wealth of inspiration why not the life and times of Chuck Jones? That should not limit you to cartoon-related imagery, although many of the most sought after works at past Red Dot Auctions were inspired by his Looney Tunes creations; you might be inspired by his love of puns, his life drawings, or the fact that he never had a cavity his entire life.

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Won’t you share your gifts with us and with the Center’s members and patrons?  If you will, please drop me a note with your mailing address and I’ll get a canvas out to you or drop by the Center to pick up a canvas. Have an artist friend who would like to be a part of this exciting project?  Please send them my way:.  Robert@ChuckJonesCenter.org.

Canvases are due back no later than January 31, 2016! Again this year we are partnering with Heritage Auctions to bring the Red Dot Auction to the attention of their over 800,000 subscribers. This online auction will go live mid-April 2016 and end the evening of Tuesday, May 10, 2016. In order to be included in it, your canvas must arrive no later than January 31, 2015. Your name and biography will be available to their subscribers!

And again this year a commemorative poster, similar to the one shown, will be printed; 30 canvases will be selected to represent this year’s Red Dot Auction. A limited number of the posters will be produced and sold the evening of the event. To be considered for inclusion, your canvas must arrive no later than January 31, 2016.

Thank you in advance for your generosity, time, and commitment to Igniting Imagination for Life!

All the best, Robert

Robert@ChuckJonesCenter.org

Our Final Winner Is!

Our Sunday (#7) and final winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Julia Knauss of Pennsylvania!  Julia will receive an original production drawing of Bugs Bunny from the 1980 Chuck Jones-directed television special, “Bugs Bunny Bustin’ Out All Over” ! Congratulations, Julia!

Original production drawing from "Bugs Bunny Bustin' Out All Over" 1980

Original production drawing from “Bugs Bunny Bustin’ Out All Over” 1980

…Ta Da! Friday’s and Saturday’s Winners Are…

Our Friday (#5) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Bruce Gamble of Alabama!  Bruce will receive a hand-painted cel art “Director’s Cut” edition, titled, “Fast and Furry-ous”! Congratulations, Bruce!

Fast and Furry-ous, a Director's Cut edition

Fast and Furry-ous, a Director’s Cut edition

And, that’s not all! Our Saturday (#6) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Ron Eenhuis of Colorado!  Ron will receive a hand-painted cel art edition, titled, “Georgia on My Mind”! Congratulations, Ron!

Georgia on My Mind, a hand-painted cel art edition by Eric Goldberg

Georgia on My Mind, a hand-painted cel art edition by Eric Goldberg

Our Sunday and final winner will be announced tomorrow. Thank you everyone who participated!

…And Our Thanksgiving Day Winner Is…

Our Thanksgiving day (#4) winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Scott Johnston of North Carolina! Scott will receive a limited edition fine art reproduction on canvas, titled, “Still a Stinker”! Congratulations, Scott!

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…And We Have Our First Winner! Black Friday Week Give-aways!

Our Monday winner of the Chuck Jones Gallery Black Friday Week Give-aways is Stan Stinson of Alabama! Stan will receive a limited edition fine art lithographic reproduction of the lobby card created for the 1957 Chuck Jones-directed, “Zoom and Bored”! Congratulations, Stan!

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A Great Yellow Dog and a Letter from Uncle Lynn

These two items, a drawing by Chuck Jones of “The Great Yellow Dog” and a letter from Uncle Lynn to Chuck and his siblings on the death of their beloved dog, Teddy, are not mutually exclusive, but they do underscore the importance of character animation that Jones was such a master of and his deep well of resourcefulness.

"The Great Yellow Dog", graphite and crayon on 12 field MGM animation paper, 10.5" x 12.5", circa mid-1960s, by Chuck Jones.

“The Great Yellow Dog”, graphite and crayon on 12 field MGM animation paper, 10.5″ x 12.5″, circa mid-1960s, by Chuck Jones.

Dear Peggy and Dorothy and Chuck and Dick,

I had a telephone call last night. “Is this Uncle Lynn?” someone asked.

“Why yes,” I said. “My name is Lynn Martin. Are you some unregistered nephew?”

“This is Teddy.” He sounded a little impatient with me. “Teddy Jones, Teddy Jones the resident dog of 115 Wadsworth Avenue, Ocean Park, California. I’m calling long distance.”

“Excuse me,” I said. “I really don’t mean to offend you, but I’ve never heard you talk before—just bark, or whine, or yell at the moon.”

“Look who’s talking,” Teddy sniffed, a really impatient sniff if ever I’ve heard one. “Look, Peggy and Dorothy and Chuck and Dick seem to be having a very rough time of it because they think I’m dead.” Hesitate. “Well, I suppose in a way I am.”

I will admit that hearing a dog admit that he was dead was a new experience for me, and not a totally expected one. “If you’re dead,” I asked, not being sure of just how you talk to a dead dog, “how come you’re calling me?” There was another irritated pause. Clearly he was getting very impatient with me.

“Because,” he said, in as carefully a controlled voice as I’ve ever heard from a dog. “Because when you are alive, even if the kids don’t knowexactly where you are, they know you’re someplace. So I just want them to know I may be sort of dead, but I’m still someplace.”

“Maybe I should tell them you’re in Dog Heaven, Teddy, Maybe to make ‘em feel—”

“Oh, don’t be silly.” Teddy cleared his throat. “Look, where are you?”

“Oh, no, you don’t. We’re trying to find out where you are,” I barked.

“Hey, I didn’t know you could bark.” He sounded impressed with my command of the language.

“Wait just a minute,” I said. “You had to know where I am, or you couldn’t have called me on the telephone, right?”

“Boy, you know so little,” said Teddy. “I simply said I called you long distance. Who said anything about a telephone? They asked me if I knew where you were, and I said you were someplace else, besides 115 Wadsworth Avenue. So they dialled someplace else and here I am and here you are.”

“Can I call you back?” I asked dazedly. “Maybe that’ll give me a clue.”

“Be reasonable,” said Teddy. “How can you call me back when neither you nor I know where I am?”

“Oh, come on, give me a clue,” I begged desperately. “For instance, are there other dogs around there? I’ve got to tell the kids something.”

“Hold it,” said Teddy, apparently looking around. “I did see a pug/schnauzer with wings a minute ago. The wings could lift the schnauzer part of him off the ground, but the pug part just sort of dragged through the grass bumping into fireplugs.”

“Fireplugs?”

“Orchards of them, hundreds of ‘em. Yellow, red, white, striped. Unfortunately, I don’t seem to have to pee anymore. I strain a lot, but all I get is air. Perfumed air,” he added proudly.

“Sounds like Dog Heaven to me,” I said. “Are there trees full of lamb chops and stuff like that?”

“You know,” Teddy sighed. “For a fair to upper-middle-class uncle, you do have some weird ideas. But the reason I called you was Peggy, Dorothy, Chuck, and Dick trust you and will believe anything you say, which in my opinion is carrying the word ‘gullible’ about as far as it will stretch. Anyway, gullible or not, they trust you, so I want you to tell them that I’m still their faithful, noble, old dog, and—except for the noble part—that I’m in a place where they can’t see me but I can see them, and I’ll always be around keeping an eye, an ear, and a nose on them. Tell them that just because they can’t see me doesn’t mean I’m not there. Point out to them that during the day you can’t see the latitudes and you can’t really see a star, but they’re both still there. So get a little poetic and ask them to think of me as ‘good-dog,’ the good old Teddy, the Dog Star from the horse latitudes, and not to worry, I’ll bark the britches off anybody or anything that bothers them. Just because I bit the dust doesn’t mean I can’t bite the devils.”

That’s what he said. I never did find out exactly where he was, but I did find out where he wasn’t—not ever very far from Peggy, Dorothy, Chuck and old Dick Jones.

Sincerely,

Lynn Martin, Uncle at Large