Category Archives: Image of the Day

New at the Chuck Jones Gallery: Kungl, Killen, Shelby & Sandy!

NEW PALETTE KNIFE PORTRAITS BY MIKE KUNGL

The Chuck Jones Gallery has represented the critically acclaimed contemporary Art Deco master artist, Mike Kungl, for more than a decade. Collectors from around the world count his inspired Looney Tunes artwork among their most treasured.

Photo of Mike Kungl and Sierra by Mark Rightmire

Photo of Mike Kungl and Sierra by Mark Rightmire

The artist has recently been the subject of extensive media coverage, both in print and television, all focused on his incredible body of work and his devotion to rescuing dogs and other animals. The City of Anaheim, California, featured him on their website, watch it by clicking here.

The strength of an artist is their ability to dream and evolve and find new ways of expressing themselves. We’re pleased to introduce new original work from Mike that will surprise and delight you as well as a new series of limited original mixed media works, the “Where’s It @ POP!” series.

“These paintings were a loose, fun, and whimsical departure for me. It’s been liberating and a lot of fun; great things happen when you scrape paint across the canvas with a metal blade!” –Mike Kungl on his new series of Palette Knife Portraits

"Gossamer", acrylic on board, 14" x 11", by Mike Kungl

“Gossamer”, acrylic on board, 14″ x 11″, by Mike Kungl

The Palette Knife Portrait Series is a delightful departure from the structured contemporary Art Deco style Mike has perfected during his life as an artist. With a fresh eye, he has let loose the strictures and disciplines required for his Art Deco contemporary work and allowed the paint to tell its story and by doing so, enhancing the Looney Tunes characters’ personalities we all know and love so well.

"Bugs Bunny" acrylic on board, 14" x 11", by Mike Kungl

“Bugs Bunny” acrylic on board, 14″ x 11″, by Mike Kungl

Alongside this fresh new take on classical painting genres, Mike has developed a new series of limited original fine art mixed media works on canvas, the “Where’s It @, POP!” series.

"Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote", 20" x 30", mixed media on canvas, edition of five.

“Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote”, 20″ x 30″, mixed media on canvas, edition of five.

Our first release in the series is a fine art mixed media reproduction on canvas titled, “Acme Blueprint–Wile E.Coyote”. Mike Kungl has spent several hours hand-embellishing each of the ONLY five, that’s right, just 5 examples in this edition. Each of the 20″ x 30″ works will be unique, embellished with sparkling glitter, gel paint, and acrylics and presented gallery-wrapped and ready to hang in your home, office, or Acme workroom. Kungl’s extraordinary color sense, playfulness, and eye for detail is prevalent in each unique work in the edition of five.

Hidden Treasures, print on canvas, free with purchase of "Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote"

Hidden Treasures, print on canvas, free with purchase of “Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote”

But that’s not all! Mike Kungl has hidden 10 treasures in each canvas–waiting to be discovered by you and your family, friends, and associates! Before you know it, you’ll be shouting, “Where’s it @, Pop!” Each example comes with a framed “Hidden Treasures” logo and list of objects waiting to be found as our gift to you.

This premier edition from the “Where’s It @ Pop?” series is available for just $2500 unframed. Add a floater frame for only $350 more. Remember this unique edition is limited to only five examples. Reserve yours today!

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NEW FROM ARTIST DANIEL KILLEN

The inimitable and droll master animation artist, Daniel Killen (“Iron Giant”, “Looney Tunes: Back in Action!”), presents his latest work for the Chuck Jones Gallery, “Semi-Struck”. This fine art reproduction on canvas measures an impressive 15″ x 20″ and is gallery-wrapped and ready to hang in your home, office, or subterranean man-cave. Limited to just 25 signed and numbered examples, “Semi-Struck” is sure to please even the ACME Company.

"Semi-Struck", fine art reproduction on canvas, 15" x 20", edition of 25, by Daniel Killen

“Semi-Struck”, fine art reproduction on canvas, 15″ x 20″, edition of 25, by Daniel Killen

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The dynamic artists/brothers, Shelby and Sandy, will make their first gallery appearance in Santa Fe, New Mexico, as our special guests for a reception in their honor at our Chuck Jones Gallery on Friday, June 23, 2017. You will not want to miss the opportunity to meet these highly sought-after young Los Angeles-based artists! Premiering a new collection of paintings. Contact the gallery director, Toshi Sanchez, at 505-983-5999 to RSVP or to be placed on the preview list.

Terri Hardin and Looney Tunes Fortune Tellers at Red Dot Auction!

The incomparable Terri Hardin, Disney Imagineer, sculptress, puppeteer, creator (you know those Foster Farm chickens, right? Terri created them) has designed the most amazing Looney Tunes Fortune Tellers EVER! She’ll be folding them on Saturday, May 6th for a donation to the Center. Add them to your “must have” list!

Tickets for the Red Dot Auction are available at www.ChuckJonesCenter.org/RedDot. Be there or be square!

 

Portrait of a Young Woman, collection of the artist and not for sale.

The Incredible Work of Master Portrait Artist, Fran Lew

Fran Lew, a name synonymous with the greatest of American portrait artists such as John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri, and Norman Rockwell, is without contemporary peer. Her unerring eye for detail and her sensitive rendering of the emotional undercurrent of the sitter, whether for a commissioned private portrait as seen below, or for one of her “Stars of Hollywood Boulevard” celebrity portraits, is truly inspiring.

Portrait of a Young Woman, collection of the artist and not for sale.

Portrait of a Young Woman, collection of the artist and not for sale.

You see it in her handling of the subtleties of the planes of the cheeks, the curve of the lips, the brilliant life streaming from the eyes of the subject, all are captured by the sure hand and artistic genius of Lew.

Audrey Hepburn, charcoal and white pastel on toned paper, 14" x 11" by Fran Lew.

Audrey Hepburn, charcoal and white pastel on toned paper, 14″ x 11″ by Fran Lew.

What makes an artist shine like this? Fran Lew exhibits an innate understanding of how to capture the essence of her subject with the finesse and subtlety deserving of the most important people in our lives.

Fran Lew’s work is represented by the Chuck Jones Galleries. She is now taking portrait commissions, both personal and from her “Stars of Hollywood Boulevard” series, please contact your Chuck Jones Gallery art consultant for details and availability.

Inspired by Chuck Jones

Artists Karen and Tony Barone, featured artists in our San Diego Chuck Jones Gallery through April 13, have honored the influence Chuck Jones has had on their art and their life in their website’s “Blob”. Yes, that’s right, it’s not a “Blog”, but a “Blob”. Written by Tony, the “Blob” covers all sorts of topics. The most recent posting, #9, centers on the Chuck Jones inspiration they’ve channeled in their most recent work, “Bugs Bunny in a Hare-Raising Experience”.

Chuck Jones by Karen and Tony Barone.

Chuck Jones by Karen and Tony Barone after a photograph by Karsh of Ottawa.

Tony writes, “I am a composite of skills and knowledge inherited from all those artists who have come before me.

“In my most recent incarnation, I am channeling artist Chuck Jones, the world’s most collected cartoonist, animator, filmmaker and Pop art practitioner. The impressions he left on me when I was a “baby” artist, but an artist none-the-less, are indelible. Now that I am more skilled, I am even more aware of how skilled he is. I say “is” because although he passed in 2002 at nearly 90, I speak of him in the present because I continue to “draw” from him.” Read the rest of his inspiration at the “Blob” on BaroneArt.com.

The Linda Jones Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 5

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. We had pool parties often in lovely, poison oak surrounded, swimming pool above the back patio…. yes, above…up the hill through overgrown ivy covered steps, which were especially slippery coming down. I learned to love to swim in that pool and missed it when we moved across the street in 1945. Here is Part V:

 [PART V] Cinnamon, Anyone?

             It was through the pages of the Canyon Crier that my wife sought wartime bargains. Her wants were relatively simple since the only thing she hoarded during the war years was cinnamon sticks. She had a morbid fear of being without hot-buttered rum, even though it was hot oleo-margarine-rum more often than not. Occasionally a grocer in a flippant mood would advertise cinnamon sticks, and shortly thereafter a slender hooded figure might be observed slinking by the check stand with a bulging paper bag. Since 1945 we have had hot buttered rum perhaps five times, which means that we still have ample supply for about ten thousand years.

Betty Branch, then editor of the Crier (Russell Branch, Publisher), inserted a plea for an artist-cartoonist of the general class of Arno, Adams, or VIP Partch, who would be willing to work for nothing. I applied, knowing full well that I had the disadvantage of not being in the class of Arno, Adams or Partch, yet smugly aware that I held the enormous advantage of being willing to work for nothing, which I knew they were not. My relationship with all of the succeeding Canyon Crier editors has continued in this same unsullied manner, characterized by purity on both sides. Neither checks nor rejection slips have ever passed between me and any editor of the Canyon Crier.

CJCC - Canyon Crier Illustration #5 website

Just how many editors and/or proprietors the Canyon Crier has known I cannot now recall, but four—I think—have been significant Branch, Rose, Bishop and Sharpe, and three of these seem to have an etymological sympathy: Sharpe, Rose, Branch with Bishop thrown in for ecclesiastical class.

[The exciting conclusion of this article next week!]

The Linda Jones Clough Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 4

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. I well remember my father’s “war warden” hard hat…with a webbing inside that fascinated me…but he wouldn’t let me play with it. He went out almost every night, from our blacked out home, with his huge flashlight and his hard hat and a first aid kit slung over his chest. The searchlights interspersed the stars…and they were not for movie openings, but searching for enemy aircraft. Here is Part IV.

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[PART IV] The Oddments of War

Thus she joined the carpool and the “Canyon Crier” became a factor in our lives. We were at about this time promoted to a kind of restricted B sticker for our gasoline ration I was working on a project to camouflage Signal Hill rather a thankless job since the oil wells could only be disguised as something that looked like another military objective like a ship yard, an ammunition dump or an air-field. I think our final suggestion was to build two other fake Signal Hillses and hope for the best, or to make a gigantic tent big enough to cover all of Long Beach. At any rate we managed to carry on, although I occasionally had to employ the steps, dare the dog, and the Rhus diversiloba (poison oak).

It was through the tiny pages of the Crier that we were informed of the activities of Civilian Defense. Dan Duryea, as I remember it, was Senior Warden in our parts. Ken Harris was block Warden. Kent Winthers was Junior Warden and I was Fire Watcher, since we were almost the sole residents of Passmore Drive at that time. The Finkel house, now owned and beautifully remodeled by Hal and Margo Findlay, was then empty and the only other house was occupied, I believe, by a schizophrenic who thought he was a German spy but never came outdoors long enough to find out. He it was who had bought the confused Doberman thinking him to be a turn=coat (or turn-pelt). The three of us then were the task force that manned Operation Passmore, and even though in the giant logistics of war such minutia are often overlooked, yet it is true that we kept Passmore Drive remarkably free of fire-bombs.

[See you next week, with Part V]

15 Years

It’s hard to believe it has been 15 years and, at the same time, only 15 years since my Grandfather, Chuck Jones, passed away on February, 22, 2002.

Chuck Jones working on layout drawings for his 1975 television special, "The White Seal".

Chuck Jones working on layout drawings for his 1975 television special, “The White Seal”.

On the one hand, I still have instantaneous thoughts of calling him to ask about this or that during my day to day activities. It feels like he is still actively involved in the world, at least in my world, because so many people continue to talk about him, continue to study his vast creations, and continue to use his guidance and principles to shape their creative careers.  And I personally continue to unearth answers from him to new questions that arise from his writings, scribbled notes, an obscure interview, or a story that someone relays to me about him in a happenstance conversation.

On the other hand, the world seems to have so dramatically changed since he died in 2002, certainly my world has, that it feels like an eternity since then.

I suppose that these instantaneously contradicting perspectives of time illustrate one of his most often quoted philosophies.  Although it is apparent that the mechanics of animation is an illusion created one moment at a time, he profoundly observed that “Animation isn’t the illusion of Life; it is Life.”  Perhaps this contradiction of illusion and not illusion points to a piece of why he and his films, philosophies, and teachings are so timeless.

I miss him but fortunately he is timelessly with me always. –Craig Kausen

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones's grandson, at the Huntsville Museum of Art's Smithsonian exhibition, "What's Up, Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones", 2016.

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones’s grandson, at the Huntsville Museum of Art’s Smithsonian exhibition, “What’s Up, Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones”, 2016.

The "Canyon Crier" masthead drawn and designed by Chuck Jones, a long-time resident of the Hollywood Hills.

The Linda Jones Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones

The "Canyon Crier" masthead drawn and designed by Chuck Jones, a long-time resident of the Hollywood Hills.

The “Canyon Crier” masthead drawn and designed by Chuck Jones, a long-time resident of the Hollywood Hills.

Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. I was in the second grade at Valley View School, to which I walked each day…actually uphill (and downhill) both ways! There were 72 steps from the street to our front door. My father’s studio was a room over the garage, which was only 40 steps from the street, but 32 steps down from the front door. I called this the “castle house” and from what I can see of it these days, it looks very much the same as it did in the early forties when we lived there.  —   I have decided to publish this article in six parts, along with the illustrations that accompanied the article at that time. Here is Part I.

[PART I]

The first time I knew that there was such a publication as the “Canyon Crier” was that night during the war when my wife began to make whimpering noises and little dog-like running motions in her sleep. This type of restlessness always presages a complaint or new statement of policy at the following breakfast table, so I was as prepared—to use the term so loosely as to be idiotic—when she gave her first post-orange juice cough. This then was going to be a statement of policy, a new venture or something current on Linda’s up-bringing from Ribble, Ilg, Gesell or Spock, known as RIGS in our household. If it was going to be a complaint, she would have cleared her throat rather than coughing. Thus do we survive through understanding the delicate code of marital communication.

“I’m going to join a car pool,” she said, smearing a quarter pat of butter on a heel of raisin bread toast. (Why is raisin bread so easy to come by during war-time?” The time necessary to chew up and swallow a rag of raisin bread toast was the time allotted me to consider a spate of short-handish thoughts: “Car-pool? Why? Where? Who? How? Huh?”

[Stay tuned…more next week!]

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Did You Ever Wonder What an Animation Director Made in 1944?

Chuck Jones’s pay stub for the week ending December 9, 1944. At the time, he was directing animated short films for Leon Schlesinger Studios.

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On January 6, 1945, just a month after the pay stub, Chuck Jones’s famous skunk, Pepe le Pew, made his debut in “Odor-able Kitty”, which had originally been titled, “Forever Ambushed”.

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The model sheets were drawn by Chuck Jones and used by the animators to stay “on model” during the drawing of the cartoon.

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Side note: “Forever Ambushed” is a take-off on the title of bestselling romance novel of 1944, titled, “Forever Amber”. The book was eventually made into a film in 1947 by 20th Century Fox. The Chuck Jones pay stub is from the Linda Jones Clough archive.

“Rubes” Cartoonist, Leigh Rubin” to Appear at Nashville, TN Library!

Attention Nashville, TN residents and those in the surrounding area!!!
 
Our friend, cartoonist and animal lover, Leigh Rubin, of “Rubes” fame, will be feted at the Nashville, TN downtown library on Monday, February 6 beginning at 6 PM. Sponsored by Nashville’s daily paper, the Tennessean. It’s free and open to the public. Leigh’s a very funny man and if you can see him live, you should do so! Be there or be square!
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