Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones's grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

Premiering the Fine Art of Nancy Cartwright, A Brief Q & A

The Chuck Jones Gallery is pleased to have been selected as the premier location for the debut of the original art of celebrated and renowned voice actress, Nancy Cartwright, at this year’s Comic Con International in San Diego, California.

Nancy Cartwright, the voice of Bart Simpson, in her art studio.

Nancy Cartwright, the voice of Bart Simpson, in her art studio.

In an email exchange, Ms. Cartwright answered questions posed by the Chuck Jones Gallery. Here is a sampling of that conversation:

CJG: Tell us about the early years, growing up. What part did painting and drawing play in your childhood?

NC: I was always very creative as a child. I loved coloring and painting and doing arts and crafts. I really liked doodling and also working with clay. . .but I never really considered it for a career. Music played another part in my life and by the time I was 10, I decided to play the trumpet. I wasn’t allowed to be in both music and art–I had to pick one or the other. I chose music and eventually played French horn in the concert band, the marching band, and the orchestra.

CJG: What do you feel you communicate through your paintings?

NC: Fun, beauty, aesthetics, some thought-provoking messages.

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones's grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones’s grandson, with Nancy Cartwright and her original painting of Bugs Bunny, inspired by the work of Chuck Jones.

CJG: Are there any major artistic influences you’d like to cite?

NC: I’ve been in the animation industry for 35 years now and my art is a reflection and homage to this art form that has served and inspired me for so long.  Being a part of the longest running scripted show in the history of television [“The Simpsons”] has completely influenced my passion for this art form.  Reverse painting has been around for thousands of years where it was widely used for religious renderings.  Much later, painting on glass influenced Renaissance art. With the invention of celluloid [a kind of plastic] in 1889, the art of animation was born.  My good friend, Dave Tourjé, is a local artist who excels in reverse painting.  His work is permanently on display in his historical home in South Pasadena that was serendipitously owned by the late artist and educator, Nelbert Chouinard.  Nelbert ran an art school that was the hub of the training that Walt Disney presented to his more inexperienced animators back in the 20s and 30s. In fact, Disney personally drove the animators to the school in his Model A so they could learn about anatomy and fine art.  This was especially helpful since it was during the development of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves”.

CJG: What is your favorite color?

NC: Coral.

"Fellini", original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

“Fellini”, original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

CJG: Why do you paint/draw?

NC: I like to create positive effects on others and this is one way to really surprise them with something they didn’t know I did!

CJG: Anything else you’d like to mention?

NC: Being invited by the Chuck Jones Gallery as a preliminary exhibition definitely needs mentioning.  I had the privilege of working with Mr. Jones on the last animation project he directed—Timberwolf.  It was for the internet and was released in 2000.  Having worked so closely with Chuck opened up a relationship with his family who owns and operates Chuck’s galleries.  I am completely thrilled and honored to be associated with one of the most-respected animation art collections in the world.

Original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

Original painting by Nancy Cartwright, acrylic on Plexiglas.

Nancy Cartwright will be the guest of the Chuck Jones Gallery as it premiers her paintings on Saturday, July 23 from 7:30 PM to 9:30 PM. RSVP is required: 619-294-9880. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Ave., in the heart of San Diego’s Gas Lamp Quarter, directly across from the Hard Rock Hotel and just one short block from the Convention Center.

 

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