Monthly Archives: January 2010

WARNER BROS. STRIKES A CHORD WORLDWIDE WITH BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY

Beloved Bugs Bunny on Broadway Concert Series Celebrates Its 20th Anniversary with Global Premiere of New Sequel

BURBANK, Calif., – January 28, 2010 — Warner Bros. Consumer Products announced today that Bugs Bunny on Broadway,
the record-setting orchestra-and-film concert that reinvented a new
genre of symphony orchestra concert when it debuted in 1990, will
celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2010 with a rechristened and
newly-created concert sequel, Bugs Bunny at the Symphony. The new concert, as well as the original Bugs Bunny on Broadway,
is created and conducted by Emmy Award™ winner George Daugherty, and
produced by Daugherty, Emmy Award™ winning David Ka Lik Wong, and their
award-winning IFX Productions.

Read the rest of the press release here.

Image of the Day: Hip Hip Hurry

HIHI-01-001

Original layout drawing of Wile E. Coyote by Chuck Jones for his 1958 short film, “Hip Hip Hurry.”  Jones’ layout drawings were not always about the characters, but sometimes about the action propelling the characters as we see in the drawing below, also by Chuck Jones.  (Both drawings are graphite on 12 field animation paper.)

HIHI-01-011 

Chuck Amuck, A Legacy of Laughter: Exhibition to Open at Tempe Center for the Arts

Chuck Amuck, a Legacy of Laughter

A Retrospective Exhibition of Art & Artifacts from

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Opens February 26, 2010 at

Tempe Center for the Arts

 Tustin, CA—Chuck
Jones Center for Creativity announced today that “Chuck Amuck, a Legacy of
Laughter,” will open Friday, February 26 at Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W.
Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Arizona.  A
free-to-the-public opening night reception will be held from 7 to 9:30 PM in
the TCA Gallery to inaugurate the exhibition which will be on display through
June 18th.  "The city of Tempe and
the Tempe Center for the Arts are thrilled to play host to this marvelous
exhibition. Children and adults of all ages will enjoy and learn about Jones
whose work and legacy continues to fill us with laughter and inspiration,"
enthused Michelle Nichols Dock, Gallery Coordinator for TCA. 

This exhibition of original sketches, paintings and
animation production art highlights the life and art of legendary artist,
animator and director Chuck Jones who not only helped bring to life famous
cartoon characters such as Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, but also created the
iconic Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner, along with many more. 

This exhibit will be the largest and most
comprehensive exhibit of art by Jones since his retrospective held at the
Capitol Children’s Museum, Washington, D.C. in 1988. 
 
The opening night festivities will also include a Chuck
Jones Cartoons and Short Films Screening beginning at 7:30 PM in the theater of
TCA.  The film festival, hosted by Jones’
grandson Craig Kausen, will be free – tickets are required and will be
available at the door that evening, but note that seating is limited. 
 

“It has been wonderful working with everyone at TCA on this
exhibition and all of us at Chuck Jones Center for Creativity are looking
forward to sharing the creative genius of Chuck Jones with the citizens of
Tempe and environs.  As Chuck Jones famously said, ‘any project is 99%
hard work and 1% love and only the love should show.’  We know that, with
the help of TCA, CJCC and its volunteers, only the love will show when this exhibit
opens on the 26th,” said Craig Kausen, Chairman of the Board of
Trustees for Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. 
 

A free to the public Family Creativity Festival will be
hosted Saturday, February 27th from 10 AM to 2 PM.  Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, the
Gallery at TCA and the theater troupe, Childsplay
will host three free hands-on art booths that day.  There will be TCA volunteer-led tours of the
Chuck Jones exhibit as well.  Childsplay, the local children’s theater
troupe will also present a performance of “Peter and the Wolf.”

 

About Chuck Jones:  In a career that spanned almost seventy
years, Jones made over 250 films, won four Academy Awards®, and was nominated
for six others. Jones' razor-sharp eye for character movement, his legendary
sense of timing, and his beguilingly irreverent wit have combined to create
some of the classic cartoons of all time, including these classic films
released by Warner Bros.: Bully for Bugs,
Duck Dodgers in the 24 1/2 Century, Duck Amuck, Rabbit Seasoning, The Scarlet
Pumpernickel, Robin Hood Daffy, A Scent of the Matterhorn,
and Feed The Kitty.

 

Jones also created and directed
some of the most popular and critically-acclaimed animated television specials
in the history of the medium, including Dr.
Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas, Horton Hears A Who, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi,
Mowgli's Brothers,
and The White
Seal.

 
On March 25, 1996, Jones' work
was celebrated with a special Lifetime Achievement Oscar®, presented to him at
the Academy Awards by Robin Williams. 

In
addition, Chuck Jones has been
honored with three other Oscars, nine Academy Award nominations, a Museum of
Modern Art retrospective, two honorary degrees and countless honors including
France’s greatest creative honor—Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

 
Chuck Jones
died at the age of 89 in February 2002, but he leaves a legacy of brilliance,
comedy, joy, color, and laughter that will live on forever.

About TCA:  Tempe Center for the Arts stages innovative
programming that enriches, enlightens, inspires and expands the artistic
horizons of f the Tempe community.  The
TCA is a unique visual and performing arts experience built by the community
for the community.    The Center offers
a unique blending of arts and culture at a distinctive destination designed by
Tempe-based Architekton and award-winning Barton Myers Associates of Los
Angeles and houses a state-of-the-art, 600-seat proscenium theater, a 200-seat
studio theater and a 3,500 square-foot gallery. 

About CJCC:  The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is
dedicated to fostering and encouraging creativity, especially in young people,
using the drawings, films, and writings of legendary animation director, Chuck
Jones, as inspiration. It encourages the expression of artistic creativity and
promotes an environment where that spirit can flourish. Jones' art and ideas
continue to influence contemporary artists, filmmakers, and writers through the
vast resource of his work accessible through the Center for Creativity's online
archive.

Interviews with Craig Kausen, Chairman of the Board of
Directors of Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, as well as images are available
upon request.
 

JonesPostcard

Chuck Amuck, A Legacy of Laughter: Exhibition to Open at Tempe Center for the Arts

Chuck Amuck, a Legacy of Laughter

A Retrospective Exhibition of Art & Artifacts from

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Opens February 26, 2010 at

Tempe Center for the Arts

 

Tustin, CA—Chuck
Jones Center for Creativity announced today that “Chuck Amuck, a Legacy of
Laughter,” will open Friday, February 26 at Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W.
Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Arizona.  A
free-to-the-public opening night reception will be held from 7 to 9:30 PM in
the TCA Gallery to inaugurate the exhibition which will be on display through
June 18th.  "The city of Tempe and
the Tempe Center for the Arts are thrilled to play host to this marvelous
exhibition. Children and adults of all ages will enjoy and learn about Jones
whose work and legacy continues to fill us with laughter and inspiration,"
enthused Michelle Nichols Dock, Gallery Coordinator for TCA. 

This exhibition of original sketches, paintings and
animation production art highlights the life and art of legendary artist,
animator and director Chuck Jones who not only helped bring to life famous
cartoon characters such as Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, but also created the
iconic Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner, along with many more. 

This exhibit will be the largest and most
comprehensive exhibit of art by Jones since his retrospective held at the
Capitol Children’s Museum, Washington, D.C. in 1988. 
 
The opening night festivities will also include a Chuck
Jones Cartoons and Short Films Screening beginning at 7:30 PM in the theater of
TCA.  The film festival, hosted by Jones’
grandson Craig Kausen, will be free – tickets are required and will be
available at the door that evening, but note that seating is limited. 
 

“It has been wonderful working with everyone at TCA on this
exhibition and all of us at Chuck Jones Center for Creativity are looking
forward to sharing the creative genius of Chuck Jones with the citizens of
Tempe and environs.  As Chuck Jones famously said, ‘any project is 99%
hard work and 1% love and only the love should show.’  We know that, with
the help of TCA, CJCC and its volunteers, only the love will show when this exhibit
opens on the 26th,” said Craig Kausen, Chairman of the Board of
Trustees for Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. 
 

A free to the public Family Creativity Festival will be
hosted Saturday, February 27th from 10 AM to 2 PM.  Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, the
Gallery at TCA and the theater troupe, Childsplay
will host three free hands-on art booths that day.  There will be TCA volunteer-led tours of the
Chuck Jones exhibit as well.  Childsplay, the local children’s theater
troupe will also present a performance of “Peter and the Wolf.”

 

About Chuck Jones:  In a career that spanned almost seventy
years, Jones made over 250 films, won four Academy Awards®, and was nominated
for six others. Jones' razor-sharp eye for character movement, his legendary
sense of timing, and his beguilingly irreverent wit have combined to create
some of the classic cartoons of all time, including these classic films
released by Warner Bros.: Bully for Bugs,
Duck Dodgers in the 24 1/2 Century, Duck Amuck, Rabbit Seasoning, The Scarlet
Pumpernickel, Robin Hood Daffy, A Scent of the Matterhorn,
and Feed The Kitty.

 

Jones also created and directed
some of the most popular and critically-acclaimed animated television specials
in the history of the medium, including Dr.
Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas, Horton Hears A Who, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi,
Mowgli's Brothers,
and The White
Seal.

 
On March 25, 1996, Jones' work
was celebrated with a special Lifetime Achievement Oscar®, presented to him at
the Academy Awards by Robin Williams. 

In
addition, Chuck Jones has been
honored with three other Oscars, nine Academy Award nominations, a Museum of
Modern Art retrospective, two honorary degrees and countless honors including
France’s greatest creative honor—Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

 
Chuck Jones
died at the age of 89 in February 2002, but he leaves a legacy of brilliance,
comedy, joy, color, and laughter that will live on forever.

About TCA:  Tempe Center for the Arts stages innovative
programming that enriches, enlightens, inspires and expands the artistic
horizons of f the Tempe community.  The
TCA is a unique visual and performing arts experience built by the community
for the community.    The Center offers
a unique blending of arts and culture at a distinctive destination designed by
Tempe-based Architekton and award-winning Barton Myers Associates of Los
Angeles and houses a state-of-the-art, 600-seat proscenium theater, a 200-seat
studio theater and a 3,500 square-foot gallery. 

About CJCC:  The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is
dedicated to fostering and encouraging creativity, especially in young people,
using the drawings, films, and writings of legendary animation director, Chuck
Jones, as inspiration. It encourages the expression of artistic creativity and
promotes an environment where that spirit can flourish. Jones' art and ideas
continue to influence contemporary artists, filmmakers, and writers through the
vast resource of his work accessible through the Center for Creativity's online
archive.

Interviews with Craig Kausen, Chairman of the Board of
Directors of Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, as well as images are available
upon request.
 

TCA invite
 

Chuck Jones’ letters to his daughter, Linda

 

May 9, 1955

 

Post # 66

 

Howdy ma’am,

     Wonder why anybody ever
went to the trouble of hyphenating “madam” into “ma’am”.  It’s much harder to write a “’” than it
is a “d”, especially on a typewriter where you have to stop, hit the shift key
and then look for the “’” which is never where I expect it to be.  Seems to me it should be where the % is
or maybe the _ or even the (.  Not
the right ( but the left (.  The
right ( actually looks like this: ). 
Know that this # is?  It’s a
tic-tac-toe graph for small insects like cockroaches.  If you ever want to please a cockroach leave a few of these
around on a blank sheet of paper. 
In the morning you will find several tiny completed games of tic-tac-toe.

     I just talked to Dottie
at home.  She said that your grades
were there, which indicated that you were still alive and that they were
excellent, which indicated that even if you were deceased that your last days
were remarkably successful. I said that I was sure that you were not dead; that
all those letters you had written in the last few days had been improperly
addressed and had ended up in the dead-letter box at the post office.  I assured her that dead letters in no
wise indicated dead daughter.  She
hastened to say that she hadn’t been concerned, only curious, she said the year
she graduated from college she hadn’t written her folks in seven weeks and I
mustn’t be too hard on you, there were eight million things to do the last
couple of months in school and that we mustn’t expect any thing from you but
bad news.  I said that it would be
better if we never heard from you at all, wouldn’t it then?  (What a beautiful sentence—shows what
you can do just by thinking beautiful thoughts).  She said “Hell no, that isn’t what I meant at all!  Stop twisting my words.  Of course I would be delighted to hear
from her.  She’s already written I
know.  Stop picking on her was all
I said.”  I replied civilly enough
that I wasn’t picking on you.  She
said I was, too.  So I’m picking on
you.

     They are actually at
work on the new studio!  I saw it
with my own eyes.  Holes being dug
in the earth!  Cement being poured
into the holes!  Unbelievable!
Perhaps by this time next week they will be digging holes in our new lot and
pouring cement there-in.  What a
fantastic age we are living in. 
Imagine!  Pouring cement
into holes in the ground!  Cain’t
believe it now.

     Nobody said nothin’
really about you not attending Shirley’s gathering of adobe girls.  What was intended was that your driving
that highway without more current driving experience comes under the heading of
foolish risk.  Calculated risks,
O.K.  Foolish risks, no.  Confidence and basic ability is not the
point.  Long distance driving is
safe only when you drive by reflex. 
When you have not been driving a lot it is necessary to approach each
driving crisis, large or small, as a separate problem and in a hundred or so
miles the mind is exhausted and driving becomes very dangerous indeed.  That is why this is a foolish
risk.  The train is not very
expensive and is considered fairly safe. 
Why not?  I am sure you
would have just as much fun while there.

     Now why did I use the
back of the paper?  Surely I have
no interest in saving Warner Bros.such a picayune sum.  Friend of mine once visited William
Randolph Hearst at that gigantic castle at San Simeon.  The thing that impressed him most,
aside from almost running over a camel, was that on the table at dinner was an
exquisite solid gold spray vase, emblazoned with lovely scroll work in shell
design and studded with precious stones. 
It dated from the fifteenth century and may have been the work of
Benvenuto Cellini.  Well, what do you
think was in that priceless object? 
Paper napkins.

 

I must leave you
now and traipse me way to art class. 
Wish me luck.

 

I love you
emphatically.

 

Daddy

Chuck Jones’ letters to his daughter, Linda

 

May 9, 1955

 

Post # 66

 

Howdy ma’am,

     Wonder why anybody ever
went to the trouble of hyphenating “madam” into “ma’am”.  It’s much harder to write a “’” than it
is a “d”, especially on a typewriter where you have to stop, hit the shift key
and then look for the “’” which is never where I expect it to be.  Seems to me it should be where the % is
or maybe the _ or even the (.  Not
the right ( but the left (.  The
right ( actually looks like this: ). 
Know that this # is?  It’s a
tic-tac-toe graph for small insects like cockroaches.  If you ever want to please a cockroach leave a few of these
around on a blank sheet of paper. 
In the morning you will find several tiny completed games of tic-tac-toe.

     I just talked to Dottie
at home.  She said that your grades
were there, which indicated that you were still alive and that they were
excellent, which indicated that even if you were deceased that your last days
were remarkably successful. I said that I was sure that you were not dead; that
all those letters you had written in the last few days had been improperly
addressed and had ended up in the dead-letter box at the post office.  I assured her that dead letters in no
wise indicated dead daughter.  She
hastened to say that she hadn’t been concerned, only curious, she said the year
she graduated from college she hadn’t written her folks in seven weeks and I
mustn’t be too hard on you, there were eight million things to do the last
couple of months in school and that we mustn’t expect any thing from you but
bad news.  I said that it would be
better if we never heard from you at all, wouldn’t it then?  (What a beautiful sentence—shows what
you can do just by thinking beautiful thoughts).  She said “Hell no, that isn’t what I meant at all!  Stop twisting my words.  Of course I would be delighted to hear
from her.  She’s already written I
know.  Stop picking on her was all
I said.”  I replied civilly enough
that I wasn’t picking on you.  She
said I was, too.  So I’m picking on
you.

     They are actually at
work on the new studio!  I saw it
with my own eyes.  Holes being dug
in the earth!  Cement being poured
into the holes!  Unbelievable!
Perhaps by this time next week they will be digging holes in our new lot and
pouring cement there-in.  What a
fantastic age we are living in. 
Imagine!  Pouring cement
into holes in the ground!  Cain’t
believe it now.

     Nobody said nothin’
really about you not attending Shirley’s gathering of adobe girls.  What was intended was that your driving
that highway without more current driving experience comes under the heading of
foolish risk.  Calculated risks,
O.K.  Foolish risks, no.  Confidence and basic ability is not the
point.  Long distance driving is
safe only when you drive by reflex. 
When you have not been driving a lot it is necessary to approach each
driving crisis, large or small, as a separate problem and in a hundred or so
miles the mind is exhausted and driving becomes very dangerous indeed.  That is why this is a foolish
risk.  The train is not very
expensive and is considered fairly safe. 
Why not?  I am sure you
would have just as much fun while there.

     Now why did I use the
back of the paper?  Surely I have
no interest in saving Warner Bros.such a picayune sum.  Friend of mine once visited William
Randolph Hearst at that gigantic castle at San Simeon.  The thing that impressed him most,
aside from almost running over a camel, was that on the table at dinner was an
exquisite solid gold spray vase, emblazoned with lovely scroll work in shell
design and studded with precious stones. 
It dated from the fifteenth century and may have been the work of
Benvenuto Cellini.  Well, what do you
think was in that priceless object? 
Paper napkins.

 

I must leave you
now and traipse me way to art class. 
Wish me luck.

 

I love you
emphatically.

 

Daddy

Show Your Memories Contest: The Winners!

The Chuck Jones Galleries are pleased to announce the three winners of the Show Your Memories Contest that was held online from September 21, 2009 through December 2, 2009.  Before we get to the winners, we'd like to thank everyone who submitted a memory (there were over 1300 submissions!) and also to thank the thousands of you who visited the site and participated in the voting and viewing. 

The memories that were shared, along with the artwork, were a touching and heartfelt tribute to Chuck Jones and his legacy of brilliance, joy, comedy, color and laughter.  We appreciate and applaud you all!

And now (drum roll, please) the grand winner of the Chuck Jones Show Your Memories is:

Amy Dyson and her entry, "Hands of a Master."  Amy wins a trip for two to San Diego, California; a VIP reception, held in her honor, at the Chuck Jones Gallery–San Diego; $5,000.00 to be used on the art of Chuck Jones, plus a $1,000.00 cash prize. 

Second prize goes to Andrew Jones and his entry, "Saturday Morning."  Andrew will enjoy a $2,500.00 gift certificate to be used on the art of Chuck Jones, along with a $250.00 cash prize. 

And the most 'viral' prize goes to Lisa Breitling and her entry, "Bugs & Daffy."  Lisa's entry was viewed over 145,000 times!  Woo hoo!  She will receive a $2,500.00 gift certificate to be used on the art of Chuck Jones along with a $250.00 cash prize.

Congratulations winners!  Each of the winner's entries are below, click on them to read their memories.