TCM and Oscar®-Winning Filmmakers Peggy Stern and John Canemaker Premiere their Documentary, CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD

Half-Hour Film Combines Interview with Legendary Animator
with Newly Created Animated Sequences based on his Childhood

Premiere Night to Feature Presentations of Classic Jones Short Films,
Plus Feature Film The Phantom Tollbooth

CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD Premieres Tuesday, March 24, at 8 P.M.

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and filmmakers Peggy Stern and John Canemaker, who earned Example4 copy B

Oscars for the animated short "The Moon and the Son: An Imagined
Conversation," have collected the memories of one of Hollywood's
greatest animators in a unique, half-hour film entitled CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD.  This film, which combines an interview with the legendary animator with newly created animated segments, premieres on TCM Tuesday, March 24, at 8 P.M., followed by a selection of his films (complete schedule to be posted at a later date.)

"Chuck
Jones used a lot of his childhood memories in creating his extensive
collection of outstanding cartoons," said Tom Brown, senior vice
president of original programming for TCM.  "Peggy and John's
film lovingly recreated those memories through in-depth interviews and
animated segments.  We are extremely proud to be involved with them on
this one-of-a-kind film that reveals so much about what made Chuck
Jones such a master of the art form."

YoungChuck_conducts 72 copy
 CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD
is a film by Peggy Stern, with Canemaker also serving as producer and
animation director.  The project grew out of director Stern's interest
in exploring the childhood experiences of artists.  In 1997, Canemaker,
a longtime mutual friend of Jones and Stern, brought them together for
the interviews that became the basis of the film.  During the
interviews, Jones spontaneously began sketching his boyhood self as he
related his memories.  These sketches later inspired the documentary's
animated sequences, which Canemaker directed.

Shortly before his
death, Jones had an opportunity to see a test cut of the film, with new
animation and archival imagery blended into the interview footage, and
pronounced it "delightful."  The Jones family subsequently provided
additional material from the family archive, resulting in an intimate
film full of revealing anecdotes about the events and personalities
that influenced his early creative life and long career in cartoons. 

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