Monthly Archives: March 2009

Chuck Jones: March 24th~ Turner Classic Movies Documentary Debut

Just a quick reminder of that Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood debuts Tuesday, March 24th at 8pm.  Turner Classic Movies has followed it with a full tribute of films.  They have chosen a great selection of his films including some films you just don't get a chance to see very often.

I would be interested to hear your favorites from the list below.

I hope you enjoy it!

Craig

From the Orange County Register today:

CJTCM-OCREGISTER

The following is the complete schedule for TCM’s March 24 tribute to Chuck Jones:

8 p.m. CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD (2009) – Premiere
8:30 p.m. “The Night Watchman” (1938)
8:40 p.m, “Prest-O, Change-O” (1939)
8:50 p.m, “Sniffles and the Bookworm” (1939)
9 p.m, “Elmer’s Candid Camera” (1940)
9:10 p.m, “Scent-imental Over You” (1947)
9:20 p.m. “Haredevil Hare” (1948)
9:30 p.m. “Duck Amuck” (1953
9:40 p.m. “One Froggy Evening” (1955)
9:50 p.m. “What’s Opera, Doc?” (1957)
10 p.m. “The Dot and the Line” (1965)
10:15 p.m. “The Bear that Wasn’t” (1967)
10:30 p.m. CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD (2009) – Encore
11 p.m. The Phantom Tollbooth (1969)
12:30 a.m. “The Night Watchman” (1938)
12:40 a.m. “Prest-O, Change-O” (1939)
12:50 a.m. “Sniffles and the Bookworm” (1939)
1 a.m. “Elmer’s Candid Camera” (1940)
1:10 a.m. “Scent-imental Over You” (1947)
1:20 a.m. “Haredevil Hare” (1948)
1:30 a.m. “Duck Amuck” (1953)
1:40 a.m. “One Froggy Evening” (1955)
1:50 a.m. “What’s Opera, Doc? ” (1957)
2 a.m. “The Dot and the Line” (1965)
2:15 a.m. “The Bear that Wasn’t” (1967)
2:30 a.m. CHUCK JONES: MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD (2009) – Encore
3 a.m. The Phantom Tollbooth (1969)

http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article/?cid=218721

Chuck Jones Center for Creativity Partners with Arts Groups in Orange County to Feed the Hungry

The Center for Creativity is
partnering with
Arts Orange County, the Orange County
Food Bank, and over 20 other local arts organizations to collect canned food March
10-31 for free distribution by the Food Bank. 

You’ve all read the paper and seen
the news; demand for free food from
Orange County pantries alone has more than
doubled since last fall, and local groups are struggling to feed all the hungry
families lining up on their doorsteps.

We've placed two barrels at the Chuck Jones Archive gallery at 131 West Chapman Avenue in Orange, CA. Wouldn’t it be
wonderful if we collected more food than those barrels could
hold?

Those of you living outside Orange County can still donate:  Visit  Orange County Food Bank's website.

Yes, We “Can”!

CJones_artscan_web

“Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood” Premieres in New York City

New York, New York–The
Museum of Arts and Design at 2 Columbus Circle will host the premiere
of the new documentary, "Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood" on
Thursday, March 12 at 6:30 PM with special guests, filmmakers Peggy
Stern and John Canemaker in attendance. The program will also include a
special selection of Jones' Warner Bros. short films.  

Peggy
Stern and John Canemaker will appear at the Museum of Arts and Design
in a program dedicated to the early life and work of legendary
animation director Chuck Jones.  The filmmakers, who each earned
Academy Awards for the 2004 animated short The Moon and the Son: An Imagined Conversation, will discuss their latest work, Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood, directed
by Stern, with animated segments directed by Canemaker.  The
documentary captures one of Jones' last filmed interviews a few years
before his death in 2002.  In never-before-seen footage, he speaks
candidly about his family's experiences in 1920s Los Angeles, recalling
events and personalities from his early life that shaped his creative
spirit.  Blending new animation–based on Jones' spontaneous drawings
made during the interview–with vintage family photographs and clips
from his classic Warner Bros. cartoons, Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood reveals Chuck Jones in a new light. 

Accompanying
the screening and discussion will be a selection of Warner Bros.
cartoon shorts directed by Jones, courtesy of Warner Bros.
Entertainment.

Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood was made under the fiscal sponsorship of Women Make Movies.

Tickets
are available at the Museum, $15.00 general and $13.00 for Museum
Members and students.  They can be purchased online at the museum's
website (www.madmuseum.org) or by clicking here.

“Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood” Premieres in New York City

New York, New York–The Museum of Arts and Design at 2 Columbus Circle will host the premiere of the new documentary, "Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood" on Thursday, March 12 at 6:30 PM with special guests, filmmakers Peggy Stern and John Canemaker in attendance. The program will also include a special selection of Jones' Warner Bros. short films.  

Peggy Stern and John Canemaker will appear at the Museum of Arts and Design in a program dedicated to the early life and work of legendary animation director Chuck Jones.  The filmmakers, who each earned Academy Awards for the 2004 animated short The Moon and the Son: An Imagined Conversation, will discuss their latest work, Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood, directed by Stern, with animated segments directed by Canemaker.  The documentary captures one of Jones' last filmed interviews a few years before his death in 2002.  In never-before-seen footage, he speaks candidly about his family's experiences in 1920s Los Angeles, recalling events and personalities from his early life that shaped his creative spirit.  Blending new animation–based on Jones' spontaneous drawings made during the interview–with vintage family photographs and clips from his classic Warner Bros. cartoons, Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood reveals Chuck Jones in a new light. 

Accompanying the screening and discussion will be a selection of Warner Bros. cartoon shorts directed by Jones, courtesy of Warner Bros. Entertainment.

Chuck Jones: Memories of Childhood was made under the fiscal sponsorship of Women Make Movies.

Tickets are available at the Museum, $15.00 general and $13.00 for Museum Members and students.  They can be purchased online at the museum's website (www.madmuseum.org) or by clicking here.

Interview with Steven Chorney–Movie Poster & TV Campaign Artist

TV Guide Cover art 72dpi
Chuck Redux sat down recently with Steven Chorney, the artist behind the posters and  promotional campaigns
for literally hundreds of your favorite TV and movie-going experiences, to find out what makes this particular artist tick…delving into his creative energies, inspirations and passions.  Discover with us the inner-workings of an artist whose creative output spans several decades of memorable movie and TV fare.  

Chuck Redux:  Tell us about the early years, growing up,
what part painting and drawing played in your childhood.

Steven Chorney:  Early years
were spent watching in awe as my father created paintings in oil.  Trained as a professional illustrator in
Toronto, Canada , he especially enjoyed exploring the abstract use of color and
shape. It seemed to me right from the start that this was what I would like to
do also.  What fun!  My earliest recollection of creating a work
of art was in Kindergarten.  After
careful review the teacher  stated
"it's pretty clear you will never be an artist"!   Perhaps that was my motivation to succeed.

CR: 
Did your parents encourage you in pursuing your artistic expression?

SC: 
Yes, my parents were both creative and always had ongoing projects
going on in the home.  They provided a
healthy environment for creativity.

CR: 
Was there a point in your young life when you knew that art would be
your career?

SC:  Without question, from the earliest of my memories, I
wanted to be an artist.
 

CR: 
What do you feel you communicate through your paintings and drawings?

SC:  In my
estimation, the goal of any creative art is not only to capture and hold the
attention of the viewer, but to infuse a "life of it's own" to the
work.  It should at the very least, have
some expression or spark of  life if it
is to communicate anything. Without that the message will be lost
. 

CHMISC013-1.hi res
 

CR: 
When do you know that a painting or a drawing is successful? 

SC:  What makes a
painting successful is the same principle that makes anything in life,
including people, successful.  Working
together.  When all the elements in a
picture seem to come together, the colors, shapes, the direction of the design,
when these all compliment each other there is a harmony achieved.  This, along with that elusive "spark of
life" are the best ingredients for a successful work. They insure the
purpose or goal of the work is accomplished whether it be to sell a product or
illustrate a story.
 

CR: 
Is it easy for you to let go of a work of art that you’ve been
creating?  How do you know when it’s
done?  Or is it ever done?

SC:  I have read
where artists through the generations have had special feeling for works and
continue to 'improve' the work as long as it is in their possession. Since we
all continue to grow with our experience I suppose we could endlessly retouch
and revise our work.  It is done when it
has served it's purpose or when the deadline arrives, whichever comes
first.  This is one reason I personally
like to have a firm deadline for completion. 
Otherwise we just don't want to let go of it.

CR: 
Are there any major artistic influences that you would want to
cite?  Artists?  Genres? CHSW001-1.lo res

SC:  There are so
many influences to any artist's development a list would be exhaustive.  But to suggest a few I would point as far
back as my father, then I would say my interests in the field of art were
largely unconventional. I was totally absorbed in the art of popular
advertising posters, record album covers, even early animated cartoons from the
likes of Chuck Jones, Tex Avery and Walt Disney. The classic arts seemed so
somber to me at that time, I gravitated toward the lighter, brighter, simpler
arts that seemed like loads of fun! 
Eventually my entry to the professional field of art came through the
back door of Animation Art.  I feel this
part of my experience was a turning point, invaluable in striving to impart
that "spark of life" to art. And it was indeed "loads of
fun"!

CR: 
What has been a highlight of your artistic career? 

SC:  The fun and
excitement of film related work.  First
it was in the Animation Field followed by Television and Motion Picture
advertising. I think the film I was most happy to work on was the Western
styled QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER movie with Tom Selleck.  I love horses and Westerns.  Getting to work on a film like that was a
highlight for me.
  

CR: 
Any special superstitions about working on a painting or a drawing?  Do you have any favorite fetishes (toys,
special pencil, can of brushes must face east, etc.) that adorn your
workspace? 

CHWOZ003-1.lo res
SC:  I would prefer
to use the term 'Inspirations' 
concerning the many odd items located throughout my work area. Toys,
automobile hood ornament, Western spurs, all these things have creative
features that seems to provide inspiration for any project.

CR:  Tell us about your working
methods.  Early to rise and work, or work
late at night?  Since you work at
home/studio, do you set a schedule for work
in the studio?

 SC:  Being flexible is the operative word, I
like the feeling of setting my own pace. 
Generally, though there must be a schedule in order to move to
completion.  I divide the projects into 3
sections, 1) research and design then 2) the basic painting, and finally 3) finishing  the detail. Working late is a quiet time to
work but not always practical, so flexibility is important.

CR: 
What’s your favorite color?

SC:  Aqua-blue

CR: 
Why do you paint/draw?  How does
it make you feel when you’re working on a particular image and how do you feel
when you’ve completed it?

SC:  I love it! I
find it to be like therapy, to be a satisfying work and  I feel a sense accomplishment all at the same
time.  After all these years I still find
it to be "loads of fun"!

Chuck Jones’ letters to his daughter, Linda

# 5 Post:

Wednesday…September 24, 1952

Dearest Linda;

Another day, another letter and my damned typewriting doesn’t seem to improve.  The two initial fingers of my right hand do all the work and others just go along for the ride.  The index finger of my left hand pushes the shift key.  I suppose it thinks it’s earning its keep.  It just pointed out to me by doing so that it also returns the carriage.  Big deal!!  Do you know I used a typewriter for about six years before I discovered what the tabular key is for?  I felt like I’d just invented it.

I’m on a diet.  I found to my horror Sunday morning that I weighed 194 pounds.  Pure flab.  So when Donn  came over I challenged him to a two-week diet: no sugars, sweets, starches, breads, potatoes, butter, milk, salad dressings or etcetera.  No beer!  We agreed on a $50.00 penalty if either broke it, so I think I’ll go through with it.  What a dreadful thing it is to have no will power.Photos orme001

I saw [two of your friends] last evening.  They came tripping past the house, giggling and gabbling.  They were in bathing suits, had just been swimming.  They want you to write to them.  Write to me instead, hm?

Has the Senator Nixon controversy struck the school?  I hope not.  It’s a hopeless sort of argument.  Had to do, as I suppose you know, as to whether he should gave accepted $18,000 as a sort of expense fund to help his income.  In my opinion he is, at best, naive, and dammit, I don’t want a naïve vice-president.  My advice to you, if you need it, is, while over there, to indulge in political controversies sparingly.  You’re probably in a nest of children from Republican families so you won’t win many converts to the Democratic Party.  

  ‘Bye for now.

Arts are crucial to democracy and should be available to anyone–from Bill Moyers Journal

From his recent interview with John Lithgow:

In a brief conversation Moyers had about poetry with a stranger:  "We're not talking about poetry to escape from reality, but as a way to cope with the world as it is."

From the PBS pledge break during the show:  "We at Public Television believe that the life of the mind, the journey of the spirit, the arts–are crucial to the health of democracy and should be available to anyone with a television."

Doesn't this sentence make even more sense if the reader omits the last three words?

Discovered Chuck Jones Sketch Book Pages ~ Part 1

I was looking through my book case today for my copy of Jerry Beck's '50 Greatest Cartoons' for some reference material on an article I'm writing and came across one of Chuck's sketch books from 1960. 

IMG-01-001

The handwriting on the cover is from my grandmother, Dorothy, which reads: "You really have caught the spirit – I salute you – Sir – Love D.      6-9-60 Berlin"

As an aside, it had a note stuck on it, probably from the late 90s because of the 'Friends' reference, that was about Jenniefer Aniston and what films she might be in.  I don't see any connection between the sketch book and the note, but things got piled together over the years and I thought it interesting… I don't recall pursuing the request.  It's actually amazing what we find in certain books at times…

Postit-small

Anyway,I thought it was fascinating to see what he drew in this book and how wonderful his thought process was in capturing the expressions of people, their postures, and their character in such a brief moment in time.

These are literally the first five pages of this sketch book.

The book measures 9.5 x 7 inches.

I hope you enjoy…

Craig

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  IMG-01-005

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I would love to hear your thoughts on these treasures…

You are invited to an exclusive online sale hosted by Kristen Caldwell, Silpada Designs

Chuck Jones adored women–and he loved seeing them celebrate their own unique
beauty.

Here's your chance to benefit the Center for Creativity by
picking out a hand-crafted gift of jewelry in luminous sterling silver for
Mother's Day, graduation, or for that special someone's birthday or wedding
anniversary.


Kristen will donate 20% of the proceeds
of this exclusive Silpada sale
to support programs including, for
example, our popular children's classes in creativity through art and
exhibitions of Chuck Jones' original work.

This special online sale is only available
March
9-23. 

Pick out your jewelry today at:

Kristen's Silpada website

or call Kristen at 949.637.2660.

Make sure to tell Kristen that you
want your purchase to benefit Chuck Jones Center for
Creativity!

Don't wait!  Share this sparkling charitable
opportunity with your family and friends.

(To make a donation directly to
the Center for Creativity,
please call 949.660.7793
.)

Many thanks to Kristen Caldwell for her generosity and
dedication to our mission of inspiring creativity. 

Bling bling; beep
beep!

Sincerely,

Cheryl Posner

Cheryl Posner
Program
Director
Chuck Jones Center for Creativity

Dazzle
her–or yourself!
Silpada ringSilpada bracelet

Silpada hoop earrings

Silpada earrings

Silpada logo

Chuck Jones’ letters to his daughter, Linda

# 4 Post:

Sept. 22, 1952…Monday morning

Dear Linda;

At work, by Joe, at 8:15 and awake, too.  An amazing thing.  My co-workers look a little shocked, why? We spent Saturday night and Sunday day with [friends], so we had little chance to get lonely for you.  Good thing, too.  You must be a pretty big girl because you leave a very large hole in our household.

I got a fifth of I.W. Harper bourbon, a very, very fine and old whiskey for my birthday.  A nice gesture from [the guy who sent it], but there is no way I could tell him that I’m not used to good liquor and that it would probably just give me the pip.

The weather continues very hot and muggy.  As Henry Morgan used to say, “Muggy, followed by Tueggy, Weggy, Thurgy and Frygey.”  At ten o’clock last night we went for a ride through the Hollywood hills in the convertible, with top down, and the air was precisely the same as our bodies.  Sort of like floating in a lukewarm lake.

I am going to start a carving.  I found that one of those pieces of driftwood was very nice inside.  I don’t know what it will be, but it will be fun.  Nothing else in the world quite resembles the effect one gets from handling wood.  Try it some time. Received your telegram at 9:30 Sunday morning.  Thanks very much. Keep us informed when inclined and when convenient.  I know you have other correspondents.