Comic Con 2017 Calendar of Events at the Chuck Jones Gallery

MARVEL, STAR WARS, & LOONEY TUNES UNIVERSES COLLIDE!

 It’s an Inter-Galactic Art Exhibit of Superhero Proportions!

CHUCK JONES GALLERY—SAN DIEGO | COMIC CON INT’L 2017, JULY 19—23

The Chuck Jones Gallery will host receptions for these fine artists:

James Coleman | Rodel Gonzalez |  Rob Kaz |  Mike Kungl | James C. Mulligan

and Fabio Napoleoni 

San Diego: The Chuck Jones Gallery—San Diego, now celebrating its 40th anniversary, announced today their line-up of incredible talent during Comic Con Int’l 2017, July 19-23. In addition to the artist receptions the gallery will commemorate their four decades of bringing the art of American Pop culture to the people who love it with special games, prizes, and raffles on Thursday evening, July 20, from 7 to 10 PM. Be there or be square!

The Chuck Jones Gallery will host receptions for the following artists during Comic Con. All events are free and open to the public. RSVP is suggested for artist appearances at 888-294-9880 or SanDiego@ChuckJones.com. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Avenue, San Diego 92101, in the heart of the Gas Lamp. The gallery will be open 9 AM to 10 PM throughout the days of Comic Con.

Marvel Comics with Special Guest Artist James C. Mulligan: Wednesday, July 19, from 7 to 10 PM, Mulligan, artist for Marvel, Disney, and Warner Bros will unveil his most recent original work and limited editions featuring all your favorite characters! Over the past several years, this multi-talented artist-singer-actor has created work that has touched the hearts and minds of collectors around the country. His boyish charm and innate talent have endeared him to legions. Join us this evening and fall under his super powers!

“Ironman” watercolor by James C. Mulligan

Thursday, July 21 from 7 to 10 PM: Meet Chuck Jones’s grandson, Craig Kausen, and play along as we celebrate our 40th anniversary bringing the best art of American POP Culture to you! Games! Prizes! Fun for the whole family!

Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones’s grandson, at the Huntsville Museum of Art’s Smithsonian exhibition, “What’s Up, Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones”, 2016.

Plus! an exhibition of the latest artwork from Pixar! 
“Chuck Jones is alive and well at Pixar every day,” said John Lasseter. Pixar studio has long credited Chuck Jones as an important influence in their work. Join us this evening as we present an exhibition of work from such Pixar artists as Pete Doctor, Bob Pauley, Tia Kratter, Randy Barrett, and Ralph Eggleston, plus others!

“Sullivan and Mike” fine art reproduction on paper by Pete Doctor

Friday, July 21 from 3 to 6 PM: Dynamic master artist, Mike Kungl, is the king of the contemporary Art Deco genre, but he’s recently taken his immense talents and directed them in a new POP art style that he’s calling “Where’s It @ POP! Each work in the series has hidden objects that are associated with the character, hidden so well that you’ll be looking for all of them for some time to come. The “Where’s It @, POP!” editions are limited to five, each one heavily embellished by the artist, creating a unique work just for you! The artist will dedicate artwork purchased for this event.

“Defending Planet X” mixed media edition by Mike Kungl

Friday, July 22 from 7 to 10 PM: American Art Star, Fabio Napoleoni, will be on hand as we premier his new paintings and fine art editions on paper and canvas. Creator of the much-beloved Marcenivo, Fabio continues to delight and inspire with his simple tales of love and redemption. Ours exclusively, “Strangely Loving It”, a fine art reproduction on canvas featuring Marcenivo and the lump-headed orange Looney Tunes monster, Gossamer, will premiere at the reception. The artist will dedicate artwork purchased for this event.

“Strangely Loving It” fine art reproduction on canvas by Fabio Napoleoni

Saturday, July 22 from 7 to 10 PM:  A Star Wars tribute! Artists James Coleman, Rodel Gonzalez, and Rob Kaz, official artists of Star Wars art, will be the gallery’s special guests. New paintings and fine art editions depicting scenes and moments from the latest Star Wars episode, “The Last Jedi” will premier. Painter James Coleman was a long-time animation background specialist for Walt Disney Studios. Since leaving “Hollywood”, he has toured the world with his original paintings and prints. Gonzalez, founder and lead singer of the rock band, Side A, found his artistic calling just a few years ago, but his luminous paintings and lush brushwork have made him an emerging artist of note. Rob Kaz, also an emerging artist, whose rich palette and unique sensitivity has earned him legions of fans. All three artists will dedicate artwork purchased for this event.

“Good vs. Evil–Yoda” fine art reproduction on canvas by Rodel Gonzalez

New from Lew! Star Trek Stars

We know that master portrait artist Fran Lew creates life whenever she puts charcoal to paper and it’s no different in her latest work, “Star Trek Stars”. This monumental portrait of James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy), measures an impressive 25″ x 19″ and is one of the most dramatic portraits to come out of her atelier.

With its dense application of charcoal in the furthest reaches of deep space to the brilliant burst of light from the Starship Enterprise that helps define the the two characters, Lew has captured the mystery and drama of the “Star Trek” phenomenon.

With Kirk focused directly on the viewer and Spock looking amused at what we can only imagine are the foibles and unreasonableness of the human race, Lew has found the chemistry that made this television duo so potent and captivating for generations of fans.

“Star Trek Stars” is now available for acquisition at your Chuck Jones Gallery. Framed beautifully with the finest archival materials, “Star Trek Stars” is ready to be enjoyed for generations of art connoisseurs.

Did you know that Fran Lew is museum-collected? Besides work at the Cornell Museum, one of her first works was purchased for the permanent collection of the Sherwin Miller Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

“Lead Us in Peace” was painted by Lew in the early 1980s and acquired that same year by the museum. It is an impressive oil painting measuring 34″ x 50″ and depicts the founding prime ministers of Israel, David Ben Gurion, Golda Meir, and Moshe Dayan (left to right).

Her brilliance is capturing the essence of her subjects without forfeiting the integrity of the realism genre. Subtle, concise, and heartfelt, her application of paint (in this instance), allows the viewer to appreciate the innate compassion of the subjects while reinforcing their strength. A hallmark of the artist in not only her earliest work, but of her most recent.

New at the Chuck Jones Gallery: Kungl, Killen, Shelby & Sandy!

NEW PALETTE KNIFE PORTRAITS BY MIKE KUNGL

The Chuck Jones Gallery has represented the critically acclaimed contemporary Art Deco master artist, Mike Kungl, for more than a decade. Collectors from around the world count his inspired Looney Tunes artwork among their most treasured.

Photo of Mike Kungl and Sierra by Mark Rightmire

Photo of Mike Kungl and Sierra by Mark Rightmire

The artist has recently been the subject of extensive media coverage, both in print and television, all focused on his incredible body of work and his devotion to rescuing dogs and other animals. The City of Anaheim, California, featured him on their website, watch it by clicking here.

The strength of an artist is their ability to dream and evolve and find new ways of expressing themselves. We’re pleased to introduce new original work from Mike that will surprise and delight you as well as a new series of limited original mixed media works, the “Where’s It @ POP!” series.

“These paintings were a loose, fun, and whimsical departure for me. It’s been liberating and a lot of fun; great things happen when you scrape paint across the canvas with a metal blade!” –Mike Kungl on his new series of Palette Knife Portraits

"Gossamer", acrylic on board, 14" x 11", by Mike Kungl

“Gossamer”, acrylic on board, 14″ x 11″, by Mike Kungl

The Palette Knife Portrait Series is a delightful departure from the structured contemporary Art Deco style Mike has perfected during his life as an artist. With a fresh eye, he has let loose the strictures and disciplines required for his Art Deco contemporary work and allowed the paint to tell its story and by doing so, enhancing the Looney Tunes characters’ personalities we all know and love so well.

"Bugs Bunny" acrylic on board, 14" x 11", by Mike Kungl

“Bugs Bunny” acrylic on board, 14″ x 11″, by Mike Kungl

Alongside this fresh new take on classical painting genres, Mike has developed a new series of limited original fine art mixed media works on canvas, the “Where’s It @, POP!” series.

"Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote", 20" x 30", mixed media on canvas, edition of five.

“Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote”, 20″ x 30″, mixed media on canvas, edition of five.

Our first release in the series is a fine art mixed media reproduction on canvas titled, “Acme Blueprint–Wile E.Coyote”. Mike Kungl has spent several hours hand-embellishing each of the ONLY five, that’s right, just 5 examples in this edition. Each of the 20″ x 30″ works will be unique, embellished with sparkling glitter, gel paint, and acrylics and presented gallery-wrapped and ready to hang in your home, office, or Acme workroom. Kungl’s extraordinary color sense, playfulness, and eye for detail is prevalent in each unique work in the edition of five.

Hidden Treasures, print on canvas, free with purchase of "Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote"

Hidden Treasures, print on canvas, free with purchase of “Acme Blueprint: Wile E. Coyote”

But that’s not all! Mike Kungl has hidden 10 treasures in each canvas–waiting to be discovered by you and your family, friends, and associates! Before you know it, you’ll be shouting, “Where’s it @, Pop!” Each example comes with a framed “Hidden Treasures” logo and list of objects waiting to be found as our gift to you.

This premier edition from the “Where’s It @ Pop?” series is available for just $2500 unframed. Add a floater frame for only $350 more. Remember this unique edition is limited to only five examples. Reserve yours today!

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

NEW FROM ARTIST DANIEL KILLEN

The inimitable and droll master animation artist, Daniel Killen (“Iron Giant”, “Looney Tunes: Back in Action!”), presents his latest work for the Chuck Jones Gallery, “Semi-Struck”. This fine art reproduction on canvas measures an impressive 15″ x 20″ and is gallery-wrapped and ready to hang in your home, office, or subterranean man-cave. Limited to just 25 signed and numbered examples, “Semi-Struck” is sure to please even the ACME Company.

"Semi-Struck", fine art reproduction on canvas, 15" x 20", edition of 25, by Daniel Killen

“Semi-Struck”, fine art reproduction on canvas, 15″ x 20″, edition of 25, by Daniel Killen

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Pirate_PepelePew_Flowers_500px

The dynamic artists/brothers, Shelby and Sandy, will make their first gallery appearance in Santa Fe, New Mexico, as our special guests for a reception in their honor at our Chuck Jones Gallery on Friday, June 23, 2017. You will not want to miss the opportunity to meet these highly sought-after young Los Angeles-based artists! Premiering a new collection of paintings. Contact the gallery director, Toshi Sanchez, at 505-983-5999 to RSVP or to be placed on the preview list.

Terri Hardin and Looney Tunes Fortune Tellers at Red Dot Auction!

The incomparable Terri Hardin, Disney Imagineer, sculptress, puppeteer, creator (you know those Foster Farm chickens, right? Terri created them) has designed the most amazing Looney Tunes Fortune Tellers EVER! She’ll be folding them on Saturday, May 6th for a donation to the Center. Add them to your “must have” list!

Tickets for the Red Dot Auction are available at www.ChuckJonesCenter.org/RedDot. Be there or be square!

 

The Incredible Work of Master Portrait Artist, Fran Lew

Fran Lew, a name synonymous with the greatest of American portrait artists such as John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri, and Norman Rockwell, is without contemporary peer. Her unerring eye for detail and her sensitive rendering of the emotional undercurrent of the sitter, whether for a commissioned private portrait as seen below, or for one of her “Stars of Hollywood Boulevard” celebrity portraits, is truly inspiring.

Portrait of a Young Woman, collection of the artist and not for sale.

Portrait of a Young Woman, collection of the artist and not for sale.

You see it in her handling of the subtleties of the planes of the cheeks, the curve of the lips, the brilliant life streaming from the eyes of the subject, all are captured by the sure hand and artistic genius of Lew.

Audrey Hepburn, charcoal and white pastel on toned paper, 14" x 11" by Fran Lew.

Audrey Hepburn, charcoal and white pastel on toned paper, 14″ x 11″ by Fran Lew.

What makes an artist shine like this? Fran Lew exhibits an innate understanding of how to capture the essence of her subject with the finesse and subtlety deserving of the most important people in our lives.

Fran Lew’s work is represented by the Chuck Jones Galleries. She is now taking portrait commissions, both personal and from her “Stars of Hollywood Boulevard” series, please contact your Chuck Jones Gallery art consultant for details and availability.

Inspired by Chuck Jones

Artists Karen and Tony Barone, featured artists in our San Diego Chuck Jones Gallery through April 13, have honored the influence Chuck Jones has had on their art and their life in their website’s “Blob”. Yes, that’s right, it’s not a “Blog”, but a “Blob”. Written by Tony, the “Blob” covers all sorts of topics. The most recent posting, #9, centers on the Chuck Jones inspiration they’ve channeled in their most recent work, “Bugs Bunny in a Hare-Raising Experience”.

Chuck Jones by Karen and Tony Barone.

Chuck Jones by Karen and Tony Barone after a photograph by Karsh of Ottawa.

Tony writes, “I am a composite of skills and knowledge inherited from all those artists who have come before me.

“In my most recent incarnation, I am channeling artist Chuck Jones, the world’s most collected cartoonist, animator, filmmaker and Pop art practitioner. The impressions he left on me when I was a “baby” artist, but an artist none-the-less, are indelible. Now that I am more skilled, I am even more aware of how skilled he is. I say “is” because although he passed in 2002 at nearly 90, I speak of him in the present because I continue to “draw” from him.” Read the rest of his inspiration at the “Blob” on BaroneArt.com.

The Linda Jones Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 5

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. We had pool parties often in lovely, poison oak surrounded, swimming pool above the back patio…. yes, above…up the hill through overgrown ivy covered steps, which were especially slippery coming down. I learned to love to swim in that pool and missed it when we moved across the street in 1945. Here is Part V:

 [PART V] Cinnamon, Anyone?

             It was through the pages of the Canyon Crier that my wife sought wartime bargains. Her wants were relatively simple since the only thing she hoarded during the war years was cinnamon sticks. She had a morbid fear of being without hot-buttered rum, even though it was hot oleo-margarine-rum more often than not. Occasionally a grocer in a flippant mood would advertise cinnamon sticks, and shortly thereafter a slender hooded figure might be observed slinking by the check stand with a bulging paper bag. Since 1945 we have had hot buttered rum perhaps five times, which means that we still have ample supply for about ten thousand years.

Betty Branch, then editor of the Crier (Russell Branch, Publisher), inserted a plea for an artist-cartoonist of the general class of Arno, Adams, or VIP Partch, who would be willing to work for nothing. I applied, knowing full well that I had the disadvantage of not being in the class of Arno, Adams or Partch, yet smugly aware that I held the enormous advantage of being willing to work for nothing, which I knew they were not. My relationship with all of the succeeding Canyon Crier editors has continued in this same unsullied manner, characterized by purity on both sides. Neither checks nor rejection slips have ever passed between me and any editor of the Canyon Crier.

CJCC - Canyon Crier Illustration #5 website

Just how many editors and/or proprietors the Canyon Crier has known I cannot now recall, but four—I think—have been significant Branch, Rose, Bishop and Sharpe, and three of these seem to have an etymological sympathy: Sharpe, Rose, Branch with Bishop thrown in for ecclesiastical class.

[The exciting conclusion of this article next week!]

The Linda Jones Clough Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 4

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. I well remember my father’s “war warden” hard hat…with a webbing inside that fascinated me…but he wouldn’t let me play with it. He went out almost every night, from our blacked out home, with his huge flashlight and his hard hat and a first aid kit slung over his chest. The searchlights interspersed the stars…and they were not for movie openings, but searching for enemy aircraft. Here is Part IV.

CJCC - Part IV Illustration from Canyon Crier_400px

[PART IV] The Oddments of War

Thus she joined the carpool and the “Canyon Crier” became a factor in our lives. We were at about this time promoted to a kind of restricted B sticker for our gasoline ration I was working on a project to camouflage Signal Hill rather a thankless job since the oil wells could only be disguised as something that looked like another military objective like a ship yard, an ammunition dump or an air-field. I think our final suggestion was to build two other fake Signal Hillses and hope for the best, or to make a gigantic tent big enough to cover all of Long Beach. At any rate we managed to carry on, although I occasionally had to employ the steps, dare the dog, and the Rhus diversiloba (poison oak).

It was through the tiny pages of the Crier that we were informed of the activities of Civilian Defense. Dan Duryea, as I remember it, was Senior Warden in our parts. Ken Harris was block Warden. Kent Winthers was Junior Warden and I was Fire Watcher, since we were almost the sole residents of Passmore Drive at that time. The Finkel house, now owned and beautifully remodeled by Hal and Margo Findlay, was then empty and the only other house was occupied, I believe, by a schizophrenic who thought he was a German spy but never came outdoors long enough to find out. He it was who had bought the confused Doberman thinking him to be a turn=coat (or turn-pelt). The three of us then were the task force that manned Operation Passmore, and even though in the giant logistics of war such minutia are often overlooked, yet it is true that we kept Passmore Drive remarkably free of fire-bombs.

[See you next week, with Part V]

The Linda Jones Clough Archive: Crier in the Wilderness by Chuck Jones, Part 3

Note from Linda: At the time of this article, February 7, 1957, the lead-in stated the following: “Chuck Jones has been Art Director of the Crier from its infancy, and herein tells you how come. He and Dottie dwell in a fabulous glass-and-stone aerie up in Hollywood Knolls, and Little Linda is all grown up and married.”  I was, as stated in the article, seven years old in 1944. We had a beautiful, big yellow tom cat named Passmore (yes, named after the street we lived on). One day I asked my parents, “If Passmore had kittens, could we have one?”  Of course, their answer was that Passmore was a tom cat and therefore could not have kittens. I said, “But IF he had kittens, could we have one?” With a knowing glance at each other, they agreed. I took them across the street to our neighbor’s black cat who had just had five adorable little yellow kittens…Yes, I got not only one, but two…I named them Rudy and Bennie…Here is Part III.

CJCC - Part III Illustration from Canyon Crier

[PART III] House with Long Haul 

I decided to employ logic. Even if I lost with Dottie, I might impress Linda. I indicated with patient yet pointed logic that the two miles to the nearest lady-ridge-resider ride-sharing intersection was Woodrow Wilson and Mulholland, while the nearest market was but a scant half mile from our home on Passmore Drive…and all down hill, including one hundred and eighty-seven steps connecting our street with steps connecting our street with the one below. Furthermore it would take a full day’s supply of gas in our gasping Oldsmobile to struggle up Woodrow Wilson to Mulholland and share in the economies of the ridge girls in their gay junkets to Finkle’s market at Highland and Franklin.

She had gained confidence through my maunderings and gently exhaling a fragrant cloud of rum, maple and tobacco, said that down-hill empty-handed became up-hill grocery laden, that the one hundred and eighty steps was a farce going down with gravity as a friend, but became an endless cement ladder going up, laden with salmon, Spam, short-ribs, and such. Furthermore the steps were dangerous; behind a fence paralleling the last fifty feet lived a psychotic Doberman Pinscher, a reject from the Canine Corps—who in being taught to bite enemy soldiers had carried instructions a step further and now bit anything. He had gnawed a head-sized hole out of his chain link fence, and travelers on the steps could only avoid the action of his garbage-disposal jaws by wading through a breast-high orchard of greasy poison oak opposite him. When Linda was with her, she had to carry her—and the groceries—over her (Dottie’s) head. All this she was willing to endure, she said, but in her illogical woman’s way she just couldn’t see what having poison oak, hydrophobia, and a weakened hearts was doing to further the war effort.

[Come back next week for part IV!]

Down the Rabbit Hole–Press Release

Down the Rabbit Hole

POP Art Stars Karen and Tony Barone Debut in San Diego

Bugs Bunny in a Hair-Raising Experience to Be Unveiled

Pooka Polka Paintings to Premier

San Diego, CA: POP Art stars and long-time Coachella Valley society scene-sters, Karen and Tony Barone, will be the guests of honor at Down the Rabbit Hole, an exhibition of sculpture and recent works on canvas and paper premiering at the Chuck Jones Gallery in the heart of San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter. Opening night reception is Friday, March 17 from 5 to 8 PM. It is free and open to the public, but RSVP is recommended at 619-294-9880 or SanDiego@ChuckJones.com. The gallery is located at 232 Fifth Avenue, San Diego.

American master POP artists, Karen and Tony Barone, have wowed the art world over the last three decades with their original and inspired take on contemporary culture. Like Chuck Jones, they have their finger firmly planted on the pulse of the Zeitgeist, a rare ability shared only by the greatest contemporary artists.

It is this unique ability to seamlessly meld their point of view with that of Jones’s that inspired them to create a work in homage to the creative force of Chuck Jones. Their unique perspective, already steeped in contemporary society, lends a modern sensibility to this classic, living character. Promptly at 6 PM on Friday, March 17, their most recent painting, Bugs Bunny in a Hair-Raising Experience, will be unveiled at the gallery.

Chuck Jones, a four-time Academy Award recipient and Director’s Guild member, is perhaps best known for being one of the fathers of the iconic cartoon character, Bugs Bunny. His art, the art of the animated film, has been shown in museums around the globe, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the EMP Museum in Seattle. His films have been celebrated at international film festivals including Telluride, Zagreb, and Chicago. He has been the recipient of five honorary doctorates as well as the prestigious MacDowell Colony Medal.

The Chuck Jones Gallery welcomes Karen and Tony Barone to its roster of exceptional historical and contemporary artists. “After meeting Karen and Tony, I walked away with the understanding that they are the ultimate creative team who bring smiles and intrigue to everything they do. They are smart, joyful professionals who put their jubilant spirit into their unique work,” said Craig Kausen, Chuck Jones’s grandson and president of the Chuck Jones Galleries.

Barone_Invitation_double

About the Gallery: Chuck Jones Gallery, located in the vibrant center of San Diego’s historic Gaslamp Quarter at 232 Fifth Avenue is the destination for collectors and visitors from around the world. Celebrating 30 years of bringing the finest in the art of American Pop Culture to collectors and aficionados, the gallery features work not only by its namesake, Chuck Jones, but also by Dr. Seuss, Tom Everhart, Markus Pierson, Charles Schulz, Fran Lew, Shelby & Sandy, and now, Karen and Tony Barone. The Chuck Jones Gallery is open 7 days a week from 10 to 6 PM with extended weekend hours. 619-294-9880 or SanDiego@ChuckJones.com for more information.

Interview opportunities with Karen & Tony Barone available. Images available upon request. Contact gallery director, Michael Fiacco, 619-294-9880 or SanDiego@ChuckJones.com.